On the Forestry Conditions of Northern Wisconsin

Front Cover
state, 1898 - Forests and forestry - 78 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1 - Chief of Division of Forestry. Mr. Roth spent three months in the field and prepared the accompanying report. The report was first submitted to the Department of Agriculture at Washington, by which it has been published as a bulletin, and a copy was transmitted to the Director of the Geological Survey, with the accompanying letter from the Secretary of Agriculture. United States Department of Agriculture, Office of the Secretary, Washington, DC, February 28, 1898.
Page 1 - Putnam, Eau Claire. This Commission consulted with Dr. BE Fernow. Chief of the Division of Forestry, United States Department of Agriculture, who advised that a careful reconnaissance be made of the present condition of the forests of the State. The Department of Agriculture offered to send an expert to make such examination, provided the expenses of the trip could be defrayed by the State. Since the Forestry Commission had no appropriation for this purpose, application was made to the Geological...
Page 16 - There is to-day hardly a township in this large area where no logging has been done. In addition to this, the fires, following, all logging operations or starting on new clearings of the settler, have done much to change these woods. Nearly half this territory has been burned over at least once: about 3 million acres are without any forest cover whatever, and several million acres more are but partly covered by the dead and dying remnants of the former forest.
Page 41 - below Menominee" is all credited as cut in Wisconsin. The following table, the data for which have been taken from the annual statements of the lumber cut, as given by the Northwestern Lumberman represents chiefly the output of pine. Since in the original statements Wisconsin was not clearly separated from Minnesota, on the one hand and Michigan on the other, it was necessary to modify some of the original figures. The "Duluth District" was entirely left out as being supplied from Minnesota although...
Page 55 - This work may be done at once or by piecemeal, it may be done thoroughly or roughly, it may assist nature to a small or large degree. Where scattered saplings and defective trees have been left in logging and have survived the fires, these trees continue to seed the ground, around each of them a little crop of seedlings springs up after good seed years (every 3 to 5 years), and, if protected, these grow and in about 20 years, by the time the mother trees are gone, bear seed themselves and then really...
Page 17 - Here are large tracts of bare wastes, "stump prairies," where the ground is sparsely covered with weeds and grass, sweet fern, and a few scattering runty bushes of scrub oak, aspen, and white birch. These...
Page 28 - Unlike the arborvitse the tamarack inhabits the swamps quite to the western and southern limits of the district under consideration, and even stocks part of the swamps of the adjoining oak and jack pine openings or brush prairies. In these drier localities it remains small, but within the more humid parts it attains commonly to 12 or 16 inches in diameter, reaching a height of 70 to 80 feet with a most remarkably small taper. It reproduces well, grows quite fast, forms very dense thickets, often...
Page 73 - Sugar maple (Acer saccliarum) is a common tree of all hardwood forests, and, to a very considerable extent invades with aspen and paper birch the regular pinery. Among the small, young growth of most hardwood forests it predominates in number. b. Silver maple (Acer...
Page 61 - RW southwest into Douglas county, is a sandy jack pine and Norway pinery, with considerable white pine in places. The timber along the lake, except that of the Red Cliff reservation, is generally cut; it is also heavily cut into on White and Nemakagon rivers and along the Northern Pacific Railway. The present stand of pine is about 3,000 million feet, of which a large part falls to the regular pinery lands. In addition, there are about 400 million feet of hemlock and an equal amount of hardwoods,...