One Coin, Two Sides: Blending Eastern and Western Cultures

Front Cover
Inkwell Productions, Aug 1, 2011 - Social Science - 264 pages
0 Reviews
Dr. Jaswant Singh Sachdev, once again, echoes the themes of duality and immigrant-assimilation in his second book, "One Coin, Two Sides." The title is a slight variation of the phrase, "Two sides of the same coin," which refers to closely related features of one idea.As Dr. Sachdev suggests throughout the book, the process of assimilation ideally involves maintaining the best of one's own culture while adopting select customs of the new country, one's adopted homeland. An immigrant's experience is, thus, like a coin. The beliefs and traditions that the immigrant grew up with in the motherland are minted on the obverse side, while the attitudes and customs that the immigrant adopts in the new homeland are gradually stamped on the reverse side.How to navigate two cultures, that sometimes conflict, is at the crux of "One Coin, Two Sides." Dr. Sachdev examines lifestyle matters, health concerns, religious practices, and historical events among other topics, to provide readers with not only answers to questions but, on the other side of the coin, with questions to long-held presumptions.Dr. Sachdev writes about immigrant issues based on his conversations with friends and readers of his articles that have been appearing in local and national ethnic weeklies, as well as from his own life. As a child, Dr. Sachdev and his Sikh family were displaced to East Punjab in India by the partition of 1947. Later, after studying at New York Medical College, he moved to Phoenix, Arizona, to practice medicine and raise his family. The immigrant experience is one that Dr. Sachdev has lived first-hand.The book he has produced is like a rare coin that shines with priceless insight and uncommon intelligence, and is a valuable addition to Indian subcontinent diaspora literature as well as for those born and raised in the West.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Acknowledgments
9
Susceptible Bodies Callous Hearts
17
Life in the West Shuttles between Weekends
23
Indulging in Personal Talks instead of Sharing Pains
29
East vs West
41
A Prescription
49
Christmas and NonChristian Diaspora
59
Blame not a Country for the Misdeeds of its Rulers and the Leaders of the Day
151
A Boon or a Doom?
159
Smiles vs Frowns
165
Taste is the Other Name of Scarcity
171
Two Steps Forward One Step Back
175
Sleeping Deeply in Seattle or Seeking to Sleep in Simla
181
Our Cherished Behavior
187
Shying Away from Ones Own Brand of People
193

India Too Has Disabled People
65
Celebrate Independence with Gusto but Ignore Not the Tragedy of Partition
71
A Passage from India
79
One Coin Two Sides
91
A Sure Prescription for Ear Death
97
The Modern Day Avatars
103
Hail the Baby Girl Thou NRI
109
We Only Preach They Actually Practice
115
Wanted a Beautiful Fair Tall Slim and HighlyEducated Bride
121
Eating All the Time and All Over
127
Modernization or Westernization?
133
My House is Bigger than Yours But whats Next?
139
A Need for Reappraisal
145
Shifting Attitudes Changing Hearts
199
Working Collectively is Not in Our Blood
205
Wine Whisky and the Diaspora
211
Can You Hold For a Second?
217
Why Label Our Tardiness as Indian Standard Time?
223
When a Healer is in Need of Healing
229
The Wording and Styles of Indian Wedding Invitation Cards
235
Time Seems to Fly Quickly in the West But Does It?
241
Revisiting Back Home is akin to Labor Pains
247
The Boss is in a Meeting
253
Inviting One or Two Western Guests to Large Ethnic Parties
257
Contact the Author
263
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Dr. Jaswant Singh Sachdev, M.D., F.A.A.N., a board certified Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology is a resident of Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A. Before migrating to United States in 1972, he completed his post-graduate studies in medicine and taught at the Government Medical College, Patiala, (Pb.), India, where he had a bright academic career and was awarded several Gold Medals including one for the "Best Graduate" of the MBBS class of 1967.A well-known multifaceted community volunteer/leader, he has been a leading member of the Sikh community for over a decade to prepare and serve free dinner to local homeless citizens on monthly basis. In 2004 he was declared the Outstanding Arizona Asian American Citizen for his various services including his work for Sikh awareness.Besides being a physician of repute, Dr. Sachdev is an author with an interest in Indian diaspora matters. Several of his essays have been published in many ethnic weeklies in U.S. and Canada to high acclaim. His first book, "Square Pegs, Round Holes" dealt with similar issue and was very well received. "One Coin, Two Sides," is a further collection of essays highlighting cultural similarities and dissimilarities between Eastern lifestyle of NRIs in a dominant Western culture.

Bibliographic information