One Continuous Mistake: Four Noble Truths for Writers

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Penguin, Apr 1, 1999 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 224 pages
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Based on the Zen philosophy that we learn more from our failures than from our successes, One Continuous Mistake teaches a refreshing new method for writing as spiritual practice. In this unique guide for writers of all levels, Gail Sher?a poet who is also a widely respected teacher of creative writing?combines the inspirational value of Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way with the spiritual focus of Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind. Here she introduces a method of discipline that applies specific Zen practices to enhance and clarify creative work. She also discusses bodily postures that support writing, how to set up the appropriate writing regimen, and how to discover one's own "learning personality."

In the tradition of such classics as Writing Down the Bones and If You Want to Write, One Continuous Mistake will help beginning writers gain access to their creative capabilities while serving as a perennial reference that working writers can turn to again and again for inspiration and direction.

 

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User Review  - bordercollie - LibraryThing

The Zen psychotherapist, writer, and teacher offers, not a treatise on writing techniques, but inspiration and notes on where be monsters. Particularly apt is "Writer's Anorexia: the Abuse of Creative ... Read full review

Contents

Brainstorming
Journaling
Enriching and Refining
Rest Periods
GUIDELINES FOR BEGINNING WRITERS OF HAIKU
YOUR READING PERSONALITY
YOUR LEARNING PERSONALITY
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Gail Sher is the author of eight books of poetry and one book on breadmaking, in addition to her books on writing. Awarded Teacher of the Year by the combined educational faculties of the University of California at Berkeley, Stanford University, and San Francisco State University, she has taught graduate classes in writing, psychology, and Zen for many years. She lives in Berkeley, California.

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