One Hundred Latin Hymns

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Peter G. Walsh, Christopher Husch
Harvard University Press, Oct 8, 2012 - History - 517 pages
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“How I wept at your hymns and songs, keenly moved by the sweet-sounding voices of your church!” wrote the recently converted Augustine in his Confessions. Christians from the earliest period consecrated the hours of the day and the sacred calendar, liturgical seasons and festivals of saints. This volume collects one hundred of the most important and beloved Late Antique and Medieval Latin hymns from Western Europe.

These religious voices span a geographical range that stretches from Ireland through France to Spain and Italy. They meditate on the ineffable, from Passion to Paradise, in love and trembling and praise. The authors represented here range from Ambrose in the late fourth century ce down to Bonaventure in the thirteenth. The texts cover a broad gamut in their poetic forms and meters. Although often the music has not survived, most of them would have been sung. Some of them have continued to inspire composers, such as the great thirteenth-century hymns, the Stabat mater and Dies irae.

 

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Contents

Nicetas of Remesiana
47
Prudentius
53
Sedulius
85
Venantius Fortunatus
95
The Old Hymnal
109
The New Hymnal
143
Columba of Iona
205
The Venerable Bede
227
Adam of Saint Victor
317
Philip the Chancellor
327
Bonaventure
333
Stephen Langton
339
Thomas of Celano
345
Saint Thomas Aquinas
353
Anonymous
371
Note on the Texts
379

Anonymous
233
Theodulf of Orléans
253
Hrabanus Maurus
259
Wipo
265
Aimar of Le Puy
271
Peter Abelard
275
Abbreviations
381
Notes to the Texts and Translations
383
Bibliography
503
Index of Incipits
507
General Index
509
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Peter G. Walsh is Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Glasgow.

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