One Up on Wall Street: How to Use what You Already Know to Make Money in the Market

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, 1989 - Business & Economics - 318 pages
10 Reviews
Peter Lynch explains the advantages that average investors have over professionals and how they can use these advantages to achieve financial success. According to Lynch, investment opportunities are everywhere. From the supermarket to the workplace, we encounter products and services all day long. By paying attention to the best ones, we can find companies in which to invest before the professional analysts discover them. When investors get in early, they can find the tenbaggers, the stocks that appreciate tenfold from the initial investment. A few tenbaggers will turn an average stock portfolio into a star performer. Lynch offers easy-to-follow advice for sorting out the long shots from the no-shots by reviewing a companys financial statements and knowing which numbersreally count. He offers guidelines for investing in cyclical, turnaround, and fast-growing companies. As long as you invest for the long term, Lynch says, your portfolio can reward you.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
4
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - browner56 - LibraryThing

For all of the financial capital under their control, it has always amazed me how anonymous most portfolio managers are. Money management companies (e.g., Fidelity, Putnam, Vanguard) are well-known ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ZoharLaor - LibraryThing

This is a short book, but long on advice even, and especially, after the financial meltdown. It took me about 40 - 45 minutes to go through the book, but I'll read it again tomorrow and maybe again ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (1989)

Peter Lynch is the vice-chairman of Fidelity Management and Research. Lynch wrote "One Up on Wall Street," "Beating the Street," and "Learning to Earn," all of which are guides to investing, tracking, and reading the stock market.

Bibliographic information