One Hundred Years of Solitude

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HarperCollins, 1970 - Fiction - 458 pages
266 Reviews
One of the 20th century's enduring works, "One Hundred Years of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known throughout the world, and the ultimate achievement in a Nobel Prize- winning career.

The novel tells the story of the rise and fall of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendi a family. It is a rich and brilliant chronicle of life and death, and the tragicomedy of humankind. In the noble, ridiculous, beautiful, and tawdry story of the Buendi a family, one sees all of humanity, just as in the history, myths, growth, and decay of Macondo, one sees all of Latin America.

Love and lust, war and revolution, riches and poverty, youth and senility -- the variety of life, the endlessness of death, the search for peace and truth -- these universal themes dominate the novel. Whether he is describing an affair of passion or the voracity of capitalism and the corruption of government, Gabriel Garci a Ma rquez always writes with the simplicity, ease, and purity that are the mark of a master.

Alternately reverential and comical, "One Hundred Years of Solitude weaves the political, personal, and spiritual to bring a new consciousness to storytelling. Translated into dozens of languages, this stunning work is no less than an accounting of the history of the human race.

This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.

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User Review  - BookConcierge - LibraryThing

2.5 stars He's a brilliant writer but I just could not get into this book. I found myself skimming and finished it only because it was a book club selection. Still, one of my favorite quotes of all ... Read full review

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User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

One of the most important books in magical realism and it shines brightly despite the fact that I read it in translation. The real and the not so real combine to create a world in which we are ... Read full review

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About the author (1970)

Gabriel García Márquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia on March 6, 1927. After studying law and journalism at the National University of Colombia in Bogota, he became a journalist. In 1965, he left journalism, to devote himself to writing. His works included Leaf Storm, No One Writes to the Colonel, The Evil Hour, One Hundred Years of Solitude, Love in the Time of Cholera, The Autumn of the Patriarch, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, The General in His Labyrinth, Clandestine in Chile, and the memoir Living to Tell the Tale. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982. He died on April 17, 2014 at the age of 87.

Gregory Rabassa was born in Yonkers, New York on March 9, 1922. He received a bachelor's degree in romance languages from Dartmouth College. During World War II, he served as a cryptographer. After the war, he received a doctorate from Columbia University and translated Spanish and Portuguese language works for the magazine Odyssey. He taught for over two decades at Columbia University before accepting a position at Queens College. He was a literary translator from Spanish and Portuguese to English. He would translate a book as he read it for the first time. He translated Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude and The Autumn of the Patriarch, Mario Vargas Llosa's Conversation in the Cathedral, and Jorge Amado's Captains of the Sand. Rabassa received a National Book Award for Translation in 1967 for his version of Julio Cortázar's Hopscotch. In 2001, Rabassa received a lifetime achievement award from the PEN American Center for contributions to Hispanic literature. In 2006, he received a National Medal of Arts for translations which "continue to enhance our cultural understanding and enrich our lives." He wrote a memoir detailing his experiences as a translator entitled If This Be Treason: Translation and Its Dyscontents. He died after a brief illness on June 13, 2016 at the age of 94.

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