Op Oloop

Front Cover
Dalkey Archive Press, 2009 - Fiction - 251 pages
0 Reviews

His life runs according to a methodical and rigid schedule, with everything--from his meals down to his regular visits to the city brothels--timed to the minute. But when an insignificant traffic delay upsets this sacred schedule, and on the day of Oloop's engagement party, the clock begins ticking down towards a catastrophe that no amount of planning will avert. A playful and unpredictable masterpiece of Argentinean literature, raising comparisons to Ulysses and serving as a primary inspiration to authors such as Julio Cort?zar and Alfonso Reyes, "Op Oloopis" the first novel by lawyer, Hellenist, boxing referee, and decagenarian Juan Filloy (1894-2000) to be translated into English.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

About the author (2009)

Juan Filloy was an excellent swimmer, dedicated boxing referee, and talented caricaturist; he spoke seven languages and he practised as a judge in the small town of Rio Cuarto, 200 kilometres from Cordoba, where he spent nearly the whole of his life. He died in 2000 at the age of 106. A world champion palindromist, he made use of the entire dictionary in his books, coined new words, and used only seven letters in all the titles of his works. He received various distinctions during his lifetime and was nominated for the Nobel Prize.

Lisa Dillman grew up in California. She studied Spanish at the University of California, San Diego and earned her M.A. in Spanish Literature at Emory. She lived in Spain, teaching and working as a translator. Later she moved to the UK where she worked as an editor and taught Spanish at the University of North London. She began to focus on literary translation and obtained a second M.A. in Literary Translation from Middlesex University. She has translated many novels and scholarly works. Her work includes Spain: A Literary Traveler's Companion (co-edited with Peter Bush), and translations of Zigzag by Jose Carlos Somoza, and The Scroll of Seduction (by Gioconda Belli). Her translations also include After the Rain by Andres Barba and Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera, for which she and Herrera won the Best Translated Book Award 2016 from the University of Rochester's Three Percent blog and funded by Amazon's literary partnerships program.

Bibliographic information