Open schools, healthy schools: measuring organizational climate

Front Cover
Sage Publications, Feb 27, 1991 - Education - 220 pages
Is your school a good, healthy place to work? Does the organizational climate contribute to academic achievement? Do you know how to evaluate the factors that can directly affect the effectiveness of education?

Open Schools//Healthy Schools offers the basis for answering these and other questions. The authors demonstrate the significant relationship that exists between school health and academic performance. They then present the measures, developed over many years of careful research, that can best test the organizational climate of any school.

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Contents

The Organizational Climate Description
25
The Organizational Climate Description
46
The Organizational Health Inventory
64
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

Wayne K. Hoy, former chair of the department of educational administration, associate dean of academic affairs, and distinguished professor at Rutgers University, is now the Novice Fawcett Chair in Educational Administration at The Ohio State University. Professor Hoy received his B. A. from Lock Haven State College in 1959 and his D. Ed. from The Pennsylvania State University in 1965. His primary research interests are theory and research in administration, the sociology of organizations, and the social psychology of administration. In 1973, he received the Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching from Rutgers University; in 1987, he was given the Alumni Award for Professional Research from the Graduate School of Education; in 1991, he received the Excellence in Education Award from The Pennsylvania State University; and in 1992, he was given the Meritorious Research Award from the Eastern Educational Research Association. He is past secretary-treasurer of the National Conference of Professors of Educational Administration (NCPEA) and is past president of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA). He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Educational Administration Quarterly, Journal of Educational Administration, the McGill Journal of Education, and the Journal of Research and Development in Education. Professor Hoy is coauthor with Professors D. J. Willower and T. L. Eidell of The School and Pupil Control Ideology (1967), with Patrick Forsyth of Effective Supervision: Theory into Practice (1986), and with John Tarter and Robert Kottkamp, Open Schools-Healthy Schools: Measuring Organizational Climate (1991). He has been described by the Australian Institute of Educational Administration as one of "the world's most widely read authors in the field of Educational Administration." Professor Hoy has written more than a hundred books, articles, chapters, and papers. His most recent books are Administrators Solving the Problems of Practice, (Allyn & Bacon, 1995) with C. J. Tarter; The Road to Open and Healthy Schools (Corwin, 1997) with C. J. Tarter; Quality Middle Schools (Corwin, 1998) with Dennis Sabo.

Robert B. Kottkamp is Professor Emeritus, Department of Foundations, Leadership and Policy Studies, Hofstra University. He received his BA from DePauw University and both MAEd and PhD from Washington University. Dr. Kottkamp has coauthored five books, the latest being, "Reflective Practice for Educators": "Professional Development to Improve Student Learning (2nd Edition)" with Karen F. Osterman. His chapter with Edith A. Rusch, The Landscape of Scholarship on the Education of School Leaders, 1985-2006, is forthcoming in the "Handbook of Research on Leadership Preparation. "He maintains a keen interest in the continuing development of the Let Me Learn Process(R) and in researching its processes and effects. Professor Kottkamp is fortunate to have chaired the doctoral research of coauthors, Dr. Chris Johnston and Dr. Bonnie Dawkins; creating this book together as peers has been a wonderfully fulfilling learning experience.

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