Opening Up: The Healing Power of Expressing Emotions

Front Cover
Guilford Press, 1997 - Psychology - 249 pages
2 Reviews
Anyone who has ever entrusted a troubling secret to a journal, or mourned a broken heart with a friend, knows the feeling of relief that expressing painful emotions can bring. This book presents astonishing evidence that personal self-disclosure is not only good for our emotional health, but boosts our physical health as well.

Psychologist James W. Pennebaker has conducted controlled clinical research that sheds new light on the powerful mind body connection. This book interweaves his findings with insightful case studies on secret-keeping, confession, and the hidden price of silence. Filled with information and encouragement, Opening Up explains:

*Why suppressing inner problems takes a devastating toll on health
*How long-buried trauma affects the immune system
*How writing about your problems can improve your health
*Why it's never too late to heal old emotional wounds
*When self-disclosure may be risky--and how to know whom to trust
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I learned a lot from this book than any other. A real surprise. Worthwhile reading.

Contents

Confession and Inhabitation The Beginnings of an Approach
1
Inhabitation as a Health Threat
12
Becoming Healthier through Writing
26
Confession in the Laboratory
43
The Battle to Inhibit Our Thoughts
57
On Speeding Up Coping
73
Understanding the Value of Writing
89
The Social Price of Disclosure Whom to Tell and How to Listen
104
The Inhibited Personality
137
Inhibited Cities
153
Confession in Context Therapy Religion and Brainwashing
169
Beyond Traumas Writing and WellBeing
185
Notes
199
References
223
Author Index
239
Subject Index
245

Love Passion and Thrills
121

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1997)

James W. Pennebaker, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. His research on stress, emotion, and health has been funded by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, and has resulted in the publication of over 100 articles and 7 books.

Since receiving his doctoral degree in 1977, Pennebaker has taught at the University of Virginia and Southern Methodist University. His recent honors include an Honorary Doctorate degree from the University of Louvain (Belgium), the Pavlov Award, and the Hilgard Visiting Professorship at Stanford University. He lives in Austin with his wife, Ruth (a writer), and two children.

Bibliographic information