Orations from Homer to William McKinley, Volume 1

Front Cover
Mayo Williamson Hazeltine
P. F. Collier, 1902 - Speeches, addresses, etc
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Page 86 - I converse only with those who pay; but any one, whether he be rich or poor, may ask and answer me and listen to my words; and whether he turns out to be a bad man or a good one, neither result can be justly imputed to me; for I never taught or professed to teach him anything. And if any one...
Page 277 - ... their own expense arm the young men with eight hundred shields: It hath been resolved by the council and people to crown Charidemus and Diotimus with a golden crown, and to proclaim it at the great Panathenaic festival, during the gymnastic contest, and at the Dionysian festival, at the exhibition of the new tragedies: the proclamation to be given in charge to the judges, the presidents, and the prize-masters.
Page 321 - ... misfortunes of the republic. They considered, therefore, that men who got security for their politics by the public disasters had been their enemies long before, and were then avowedly such. They thought it right also, that the person who was to speak in honor of the fallen and celebrate their valor should not have sat under the same roof or at the same table with their antagonists ; that he should not revel there and sing a...
Page 322 - Gods never lack success, nor strive in vain, But man must suffer what the fates ordain. Do you hear, ^Eschines, in this very inscription, that " Gods never lack success, nor strive in vain ? " Not to the statesman does it ascribe the power of giving victory in battle, but to the Gods. Wherefore then, execrable man, do you reproach me with these things ? Wherefore utter such language ? I pray that it may fall upon the heads of you and yours. Many other accusations and falsehoods he urged against...
Page 325 - ... could tempt or induce to betray aught that I considered just and beneficial to my country. Whatever I have advised my fellowcitizens, I have never advised like you men, leaning as in a balance to the side of profit: all my proceedings have been those of a soul upright, honest, and incorrupt: intrusted with affairs of greater magnitude than any of my contemporaries, I have administered them all honestly and faithfully.
Page 330 - In authority, his constant aim should be the dignity and pre-eminence of the commonwealth; in all times and circumstances his spirit should be loyal. This depends upon nature; power and might upon other things. Such a spirit, you will find, I have ever sincerely cherished. Only see. When my person was demanded — when they brought Amphictyonic suits against...
Page 295 - Now, ^Eschines, how would you have me describe you, and how myself, upon that day ? Shall I call myself Batalus, your nickname of reproach, and you. not even a hero of the common sort, but one of those upon the stage, Cresphontes or Creon, or the...
Page 244 - ... both, before he determines upon the whole case. As I am, it appears, on this day to render an account both of my private life and my public measures, I would fain, as in the outset, call the gods to my aid; and in your presence I implore them, first, that the good-will which I have ever cherished toward the commonwealth and all of you may be fully requited to me on the present trial; next, that they may direct you to such a decision upon this indictment as will conduce to your common honor, and...
Page 294 - if we determine on the present occasion to remember any unkindness which the Thebans have done us, and to regard them in the character of enemies with distrust, in the first place, we shall be doing just what Philip would desire; in the next place, I fear his present adversaries embracing his friendship and all Philippizing with one consent, they will both march against Attica.
Page 312 - Philip—and that, too, by words! For what else had I at my command ? Certainly not the spirit of each individual, nor the fortune of the army, nor the conduct of the War, for which you would make me accountable; such a blunderer are you! Yet understand me. Of what a statesman may be responsible for I allow the utmost scrutiny; I deprecate it not. What are his functions? To observe things in the beginning, to foresee and foretell them to...

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