Order and History, Volume 5

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University of Missouri Press, 2000 - History - 448 pages
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Contents

The Beginning of the Beginning
27
Reflective Distance vs Reflective Identity
63
Epilogue
125

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Page 14 - In consideratione creaturarum non est vana et peritura curiositas exercenda; sed gradus ad immortalia et semper manentia faciendus.
Page 35 - In this second sense, then, reality is not an object of consciousness but the something in which consciousness occurs as an event of participation between partners in the community of being.
Page 22 - At the center of his existence man is unknown to himself and must remain so, for the part of being that calls itself man could be known fully only if the community of being and its drama in time were known as a whole. Man's partnership in being is the essence of his existence, and this essence depends on the whole, of which existence is a part.
Page 27 - The life of the soul in openness toward God, the waiting, the periods of aridity and dulness, guilt and despondency, contrition and repentance, forsakenness and hope against hope, the silent stirrings of love and grace, trembling on the verge of a certainty which if gained is loss — the very lightness of this fabric may prove too heavy a burden for men who lust for massr ;ly possessive experience.
Page 24 - It is the violation of the First and Tenth Commandments, if we want to use the language of Vgl.
Page 27 - The bond is tenuous, indeed, and it may snap easily. The life of the soul in openness toward God, the waiting, the periods of aridity and dullness, guilt and despondency, contrition and repentance, forsakenness and hope against hope, the silent stirrings of love and grace...
Page 36 - To denote the reality that comprehends the partners in being, ie, God and the world, man and society, no technical term has been developed, as far as I know, by anybody. However, I notice that philosophers, when they run into this structure incidentally in their exploration of other subject matters, have a habit of referring to it by a neutral 'it.' The It referred to is the mysterious 'it' that also occurs in everyday language in such phrases as 'it rains.

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