Orestes

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Oxford University Press, Jun 8, 1995 - Drama - 128 pages
Based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves can properly recreate the celebrated and timeless tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, The Greek Tragedy in New Translations series offers new translations that go beyond the literal meaning of the Greek in order to evoke the poetry of the originals. Under the editorship of Herbert Golder and the late William Arrowsmith, each volume includes a critical introduction, commentary on the text, full stage directions, and a glossary of the mythical and geographical references in the plays. Produced more frequently on the ancient stage than any other tragedy, Orestes retells with striking innovations the story of the young man who kills his mother to avenge her murder of his father. Though eventually exonerated, Orestes becomes a fugitive from the Furies (avenging spirits) of his mother's blood. On the brink of destruction, he is saved in the end by Apollo, who had commanded the matricide. Powerful and gripping, Orestes sweeps us along with a momentum that starting slowly, builds inevitably to one of the most spectacular climaxes in all Greek tragedy.
 

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Orestes

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Drawing on the material of the Orestia, Euripides's Orestes is a strange and disturbing play, condemning all of its heroes for their violence and criminality and culminating in one of the most wildly ... Read full review

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
ORESTES
19
NOTES ON THE TEXT
93
GLOSSARY
109
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

John Peck, author of five books of poetry, is a Jungian analyst in Brattleboro, Vermont, who has taught English at Princeton University, Mt. Holyoke College, and the University of Zurich. Frank Nisetich is Professor of Classics at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, and the author of Pindar's Victory Songs and Pindar and Homer.

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