Organizational Stress: A Review and Critique of Theory, Research, and Applications

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This book examines stress in organizational contexts. The authors review the sources and outcomes of job-related stress, the methods used to assess levels and consequences of occupational stress, along with the strategies that might be used by individuals and organizations to confront stress and its associated problems. One chapter is devoted to examining an extreme form of occupational stress--burnout, which has been found to have severe consequences for individuals and their organizations. The book closes with a discussion of scenarios for jobs and work in the new millennium, and the potential sources of stress that these scenarios may generate.

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Contents

What Is Stress?
1
lobRelated Sources of Strain
27
Methodological Issues in Iob Stress Research
211
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Professor Sir Cary Cooper, CBE, is The 50th Anniversary Professor of Organizational Psychology and Health at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, UK. He is also the President of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, President of the British Academy of Management and President of RELATE (the national relationship charity). He is the author/editor of over 150 books, over 400 scholarly articles and a regular contributor to radio and TV. He was knighted by the Queen in 2014 for his contribution to the social sciences.

He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Management (14 volumes), Editor of Who’s Who in Management, Editor of the Wiley-Blackwell WELLBEING volumes (six), Founding Editor of the Journal of Organizational Behavior, Founding and Former Chair of the government think tank The Sunningdale Institute and lead scientist on the Government Office for Science Foresight project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing. In 2015 he was voted by HR Magazine as the Most Influential HR Thinker, has been made an Honorary Fellow of the British Psychological Society, Royal College of Physicians, The Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (Occupational Medicine) and many more; and has Honorary Doctorates from a number of universities (eg Sheffield, Bath, Aston, Heriot Watt, Middlesex, Wolverhampton).

Philip Dewe is Emeritus Professor of Organizational Behaviour in the Department of Organizational Psychology, Birkbeck, University of London. He graduated with a Masters degree in management and administration from Victoria University in Wellington, New Zealand and with an MSc and PhD from the London School of Economics. After a period of work in commerce in New Zealand he became a Senior Research Officer in the Work Research Unit, Department of Employment (UK). In 1980 he joined Massey University in New Zealand and headed the Department of Human Resource Management until joining the Department of Organizational Psychology, Birkbeck, University of London in 2000. Research interests include work stress and coping, emotions and human resource accounting. He is a member of the editorial board of Work & Stress. He has written widely in the area of work stress and coping.

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