Organizing Schools for Productive Learning

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 27, 2008 - Education - 112 pages
A major problem confronting schools is that many students are turned off from learning and are bored. Boredom is destructive of learning. The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) initiative of the US government (2001) stemmed from the claim – accompanied by sharp debates pro and con – that many schools in the United States fail to achieve basic educational objectives, and that many schools are doing a poor job for a wide variety of reasons and surely not just because of student boredom (Brigham, Gustashaw, Wiley, & Brigham, 2004; Essex, 2006; Goodman, Shannon, Goodman, & Rapoport, 2004; Sunderman, Tracey Jr. , Kim, & Orfield, 2004). The model of school organization and instruction presented here seeks to provide an effective plan for significant improvement in secondary school education, one of whose central aims is to make students genuinely engaged in what they are learning. The NCLB legislation emphasizes, inter alia, the need for school improvement. Without it one cannot reasonably anticipate improvement over current levels in student engagement in learning and in academic achievement. The NCLB literature frequently employs the term “school improvement” to refer to the quality of the teachers, such as their academic credentials, instructional competence, and their knowledge of subject matter. Similarly, “school restructuring” is said to include steps such as transforming the school into a charter school, replacing the teaching staff, or inviting a private company to administer the school. The use of those terms in this work is distinctly different.
 

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Contents

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Copyright

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Page 4 - How many students, for example, were rendered callous to ideas, and how many lost the impetus to learn because of the way in which learning was experienced by them? How many acquired special skills by means of automatic drill so that their power of judgment and capacity to act intelligently in new situations was limited? How many came to associate the learning process with ennui and boredom? How many found what they did learn so foreign to the situations...
Page 9 - Elmore (1995) has concluded that changes "in structure are weakly related to changes in teaching practice, and therefore structural change does not necessarily lead to changes in teaching, learning, and student performance
Page 92 - Restructuring a comprehensive high school', Educational Leadership, 47 (7): 28-31. Cardellichio, TL (1995) 'Curriculum and the structure of school', Phi Delta Kappan, 76 (8): 629-32. Carroll, JM (1994) The Copernican Plan evaluated: the evolution of a revolution', Phi Delta Kappan 76 (2): 105-13.
Page 4 - ... were rendered callous to ideas, and how many lost the impetus to learn because of the way in which learning was experienced by them? How many acquired special skills by means of automatic drill so that their power of judgment and capacity to act intelligently in new situations was limited? How many came to associate the learning process with ennui and boredom? How many found what they did learn so foreign to the situations of life outside the school as to give them no power of control over the...
Page 13 - ... defining personnel - both citizen and elite - for the modern state and economy" (Meyer & Rowan, 1983, p. 83). In this view of schooling, standardized categories of graduates are produced through the use of standardized types of teachers, students, topics and activities. These graduates are allocated places in the economic and stratification system on the basis of their certified educational background. Through this certification role the 'ritual classifications of education' (ie student, teacher,...
Page 94 - ... instructional practices. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Science. Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Lewin, K. (1935). A dynamic theory of personality. New York: McGraw Hill. Ma, X. (2003). Sense of belonging to school: Can schools make a difference? Journal of Educational Research, 96(6), 340-349. Martino, W., & Frank, B. (2006) 'The Tyranny of Surveillance': Male...

About the author (2008)

Shlomo Sharan is professor emeritus at the Jaime and Joan Constantiner School of Education, Tel-Aviv University. Some of his works include The Innovative School, Handbook of Cooperative Learning Methods, and Israel and the Post Zionists.

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