Orificial Surgery and Its Application to the Treatment of Chronic Diseases

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Halsey Brothers, 1891 - Chronic diseases - 164 pages
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Page 5 - ... in all pathological conditions, surgical or medical, which linger persistently, in spite of all efforts at removal, from the delicate derangements of brain substance that induce insanity and the various forms of neurasthenia, to the great variety of morbid changes, repeatedly found in the coarser structures of the body, there will invariably be found more or less irritation of the rectum, or the orifices of the sexual system, or of both.
Page 5 - ... there will invariably be found more or less irritation of the rectum, or the orifices of the sexual system, or of both. In other, words, there is one predisposing cause for all forms of chronic diseases, and that is, a nerve waste, occasioned by orificial irritation at the lower openings of the bocly.
Page 26 - ... the rectal muscle to these nerves and compress them, the patient so operated upon would gasp for breath, and if the pressure were continued breathing would cease and life would soon become extinct. Dr. EH Pratt, of the Chicago Homeopathic Medical College, said: "Disturbance of the sympathetic nerves, although they do not make themselves known in the language of pain, greatly disturb the various functions of the body, interfering seriously with its nutrition but very readily escaping the notice...
Page 5 - In other words, there is one predisposing cause for all forms of chronic diseases, and that is a nerve waste occasioned by orificial irritation at the lower openings of the body. These irritations induce a rigidity of the sphincters guarding the parts which either continues, sympathetically affecting the rest of the 'involuntary muscular system, and steadily draining the nervous power that supplies it, until the whole struggle terminates in a rigor mortis, or tiring out in the hopeless grip, it relaxes...
Page 6 - ... a previous condition of irritation and congestion of these parts has been transferred from them to other parts by metastasis. Clinical experience teaches us that the rule announced by Dr. Pratt that the "irritation of an organ begins at its mouth...
Page 1 - If the blood current is strong and free, health is assured ; if, on the other hand, the general circulation is sluggish, or local congestions occur, morbid processes are of necessity initiated. There is not a pathological lesion that does not have its beginning in blood stasis. To re-establish and to maintain a normal circulation, local and general, is, therefore, the great problem that demands solution in the successful treatment of chronic diseases, both medical and surgical . — PRATT.
Page 114 - To be prepared for use it is first to be boiled for an hour in a five per cent solution of carbolic acid, after which it is to be boiled for another hour in pure water.
Page 152 - ... all the suffrutescent and woody forms; or else their growth is completed within the course of a few weeks, or at most a few months, during those portions of the year when mesophytic conditions prevail to some extent over the country. There appears to be little middle ground in this matter.
Page 43 - ... times past much practiced, and often with success. But the occurrence of many fatal cases of bleeding has deterred the modern practitioner. Sir Astley Cooper's cases are well known to the profession, and, were all surgeons as candid, we should have many more such beacon lights. Were the bleeding part so located as to be accessible to our remedies, there would be no risk; but, when a hemorrhoidal tumor has been cut away with the knife, the wounded surface retires within the sphincter, and is reached...
Page 2 - By night and by day, in rest and in toil, under all conditions and at all times, without the aid of the cerebro•spinal system, the sympathetic force is still maintaining the functions of animal life.

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