The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

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J. Murray, 1902 - Evolution - 432 pages
 

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This classic series represents the Western canon not without academic controversy. The latest volumes of the Great Books include some women writers, but they are still definitely underrepresented ... Read full review

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Contents

I
31
II
74
III
98
IV
120
V
190
VI
233
VII
288
VIII
346
IX
7
X
54
XI
96
XII
137
XIII
180
XIV
211
XV
276

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Page 21 - In the distant future I see open fields for far more important researches. Psychology will be based on a new foundation, that of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by gradation. Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.
Page 279 - If it could be proved that any part of the structure of any one species had been formed for the exclusive good of another species, it would annihilate my theory, for such could not have been produced through natural selection.
Page 147 - Every species has come into existence coincident both in space and time with a pre-existing closely allied species.
Page 121 - If such do occur, can we doubt (remembering that many more individuals are born than can possibly survive) that individuals having any advantage, however slight, over others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind ? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favourable individual differences and variations, and the destruction of those which are injurious, I have called Natural...
Page 255 - If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down.
Page 132 - ... perform strange antics before the females, which, standing by as spectators, at last choose the most attractive partner.
Page 316 - There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.
Page 58 - We cannot suppose that all the breeds were suddenly produced as perfect and as useful as we now see them ; indeed, in several cases, we know that this has not been their history. The key is man's power of accumulative selection : nature gives successive variations ; man adds them up in certain directions useful to him.
Page 122 - So again it is difficult to avoid personifying the word Nature; but I mean by Nature, only the aggregate action and product of many natural laws, and by laws the sequence of events as ascertained by us.
Page 316 - Thus from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving — namely, the production of the higher animals — directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one...

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