Original Skin: Exploring the Marvels of the Human Hide

Front Cover
Counterpoint Press, Jun 1, 2011 - Science - 320 pages
“Like the air we breathe, we take our skin for granted . . . Yet it is remarkable; it mitigates and ameliorates the sometimes harsh world we dwell in, and is at the interface of so much of what we encounter. It is our border, the edge of ourselves, the point where we meet our universe.”

Original Skin is at times a scientific study, remarking on the biological magic behind the human body’s largest organ. At others it becomes an anthropological survey, dissecting separate societies’ attitudes towards bare bodies, and the motives behind cultural rituals such as tattoos. However, Original Skin is, above all, a celebration of the human body; its tone one of absolute awe for the simultaneously protective and fragile membrane that divides us all from the world that surrounds us. Maryrose Cuskelly’s book—in its examinations of everything from tickling to Botox to books bound in human derma—is a delightful meditation on skin.
 

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Original Skin

User Review  - Thorpe-Bowker and Contributors - Books+Publishing

Our skin plays a huge part in our identity. It has been responsible for a variety of social movements from binding people to lives of servitude to a billion-dollar cosmetic industry. In Original Skin ... Read full review

Contents

Empresses of the Japanese Bath
1
the bodys envelope
4
Touch Me
20
the colour of skin
43
scars moles and other blemishes
60
blushing and tickling
84
skin and disease
101
Shes Got Perfect Skin
117
anthropodermic bibliopegy
164
the romance of fingerprints
177
burns injuries
192
the Donor Tissue Bank of Victoria
222
semiliving sculpture
233
The Skin Were In
249
Sources
257
Acknowledgements
273

The Lure of the Tattoo
132
skinning and the human pelt
150

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About the author (2011)

Maryrose Cuskelly is a freelance writer and editor. She has had essays and articles published in a range of magazines, journals, and newspapers, including Family Circle and The Melbourne Times. She lives in Melbourne with her husband and their two sons.

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