Origins Of Magnetospheric Physics: An Expanded Edition

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University of Iowa Press, 2004 - Science - 148 pages
Early in 1958, instruments on the space satellites Explorer I and Explorer III revealed the presence of radiation belts, enormous populations of energetic particles trapped in the magnetic field of the earth. Originally published in 1983 but long out of print until now, Origins of Magnetospheric Physics tells the story of this dramatic and hugely transformative period in scientific and Cold War history. Writing in an accessible style and drawing on personal journals, correspondence, published papers, and the recollections of colleagues, James Van Allen documents a trail-blazing era in space history
 

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Contents

I Scientific Heritage
9
II The U S Program of Rocket Flights of Scientific Equipment
15
III Rockoon Flights from Baffin Bay to the Ross Sea
21
IV Remarks on the Period 194657
31
V Plans for Scientific Work with Artificial Satellites of the Earth
33
VI Sputnik I
43
VII Discovery of the Inner Radiation Belt of the EarthExplorers I and III
49
VIII The Argus Tests
73
IX Early Confirmations of the Inner Radiation Belt and Discovery of the Outer Radiation BeltExplorer IV and Pioneers I II III IV and V
85
X Related Work with Sputniks II and III and Luniks I II and III
93
XI Second Generation Investigations and Advances in Physical Interpretation
101
Proposal for Cosmic Ray Observations in Earth Satellites 1955
122
Correspondence Regarding Pravda Article 1959
128
Bibliography
131
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About the author (2004)

Space pioneer James Van Allen, now professor emeritus of physics at the University of Iowa, served as president of the American Geophysical Union from 1982 to 1984 and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received a Gold Medal of the (U.K.) Royal Astronomical Society in 1978, a National Medal of Science from President Ronald Regan in 1987, and a Crafoord Prize of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences from King Carl XVI Gustaf in 1989.

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