Os Lusiadas (the Lusiads)

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B. Quaritch, 1880 - Epic poetry, Portuguese - 471 pages
 

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Page 93 - ... deemeth by the last labour of the Theban Brave. Big with the burthen of her tribes she teemeth, circled by whelming waves that rage and rave ; all noble races of such valiant breast, that each may justly boast itself the best. " Hers the Tarragonese who, famed in war, 19 made aye-perturbed Parthenope...
Page xi - the perfection of a traveller's study. A wayfarer and a voyager from his youth ; a soldier, somewhat turbulent withal, wounded, and blamed for his wounds ; a doughty Sword and. yet doughtier Pen, a type of the chivalrous age, a patriot of the purest water, so jealous of his country's good fame that nothing would satisfy him but to see the world bow before her perfections ; a genius, the first and foremost of his day, who died in the direst poverty and distress.
Page 96 - Godfrey1 left no foe to be subdued, and all Judaea conquered was and saved, many that in his wars had done devoir to their own lordships took the way once more. " But when this stout and gallant Hun attained 28 Life's fatal period, age and travail-spent, he gave, by Death's necessity constrained, his...
Page 98 - Right soon that noble Prince clear vict'ory won 33 from his harsh Mother and her Fere indign ; in briefest time the land obeyed the son, though first to fight him did the folk incline. But reft of reason and by rage undone he bound the Mother in the biting chain : Eftsoons avenged her griefs the hand of God : Such veneration is to parents owe'd. "Lo! the superb Castilian 'gins prepare 34 his pow'er to 'venge Teresa's injuries, against the Lusian land in men so rare, whereon ne toil ne trouble heavy...
Page viii - ... splendidly and literally translated. No one was so well fitted as Richard to bring out this epic and heroic life. He divided his work into six heads: Biographical, Bibliographical, Historical and Chronological, Geographical, and Annotative—it was the result of a daily act of devotion of more than twenty years, from a man of this age, who has taken the hero of a former age for his model, his master, as Dante did Virgil; and between whose two fates—master and disciple—exists a strange similarity....
Page 13 - t was erst, and well you wot it, given, 25 albeit a Pow'r so single, simple, small, to see the doughty Moor from 'trenchments driven where gentle Tagus feeds and floods the vale : Then with the dreadful Spaniard have they striven, by boon of Heav'n serene ne'er known to fail ; and urged their fortune's ever-glorious claim to victor-trophies hung in fane of Fame. " Godheads ! I leave that antique fame unsaid, 26 reft from the race of Romulus their foes ; when, by their warrior Viria'tus led, so high...
Page 5 - Taprobane-land,1 forceful in perils and in battle-post, with more than promised force of mortal hand ; and in the regions of a distant race rear'da new throne so haught in Pride of Place : And, eke, the Kings of mem'ory grand and glorious, who hied them Holy Faith and Reign to spread, converting, conquering, and in lands notorious, Africk and Asia, devastation made ; nor less the Lieges who by deeds memorious brake from the doom that binds the vulgar dead ; my song would sound o'er Earth's extremest...
Page 230 - Drows'iness mastered, all half-numbed and chill 39 shivered with many a yawn the huddling Crew beneath the bulging main-sail, clothed ill to bear the nightly breath that keenly blew ; their eyes, kept open sore against their will, they rubbed, and stretcht their torpid limbs anew : To seek a waking-draught the men devise, spin stories, tell a thousand histories. One 'gan to say, " Wherewith may better we 40 spur tardy Time who lags so sore and slow, save with some pretty tale of joyaunce gay that...
Page 9 - Nuno, fierce in fight, 1 2 who for his King and Country freely bled ; an Egas and a Fuas ; l fain I might for them my lay with harp Homeric wed ! For the twelve peerless Peers again I cite the Twelve of England by Magrigo led : Nay, more, I give thee Gama's noble name, who for himself claims all /Eneas
Page 249 - Suffering the frigid rigours in th' embrace Of South, and regions lorn and lere, and lone, Swallowing the tainted rations scanty dole, Salted with toil of body, moil of soul. Thus honour'd hardness shall the heart prevail, To scoff at honours, and vile gold di>dain.

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