Other Colors: Essays and a Story

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Knopf Canada, Oct 22, 2010 - Literary Collections - 464 pages
3 Reviews
Knopf Canada is proud to welcome Orhan Pamuk to the list with an inspiring and engaging collection of essays on literary and personal subjects–his first new book since winning the Nobel Prize.

In the three decades that Pamuk has devoted to writing fiction, he has also produced scores of witty, moving and provocative essays and articles. Here is a thoughtful compilation of a dazzling novelist’s best non-fiction, offering different perspectives on his lifelong obsessions.

Pamuk’s criticism, autobiographical writing and meditations are presented alongside interviews he has given and selections from his private notebooks. He engages the work of other novelists, including Sterne and Dostoyevsky, Salman Rushdie and Patricia Highsmith, and he discusses his own books and writing process. We learn not just how he writes but how he lives as he recounts his successful struggle to quit smoking and describes his relationship with his daughter. Ordinary events–applying for a passport, the death of a relative–inspire extraordinary flights of association as the novelist reflects on everything from the child’s state of being to divergent attitudes towards art in the East and West.

Illustrated with photographs, paintings and the author’s own sketches, Other Colors gives us Orhan Pamuk’s world through a kaleidoscope whose brilliant, shifting themes and moods together become a radiant and meaningful whole.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lrcaborn - LibraryThing

Pamuk has inspiring observations about other writers. His short story is autobiographical and presented from both a naive and scheming viewpoint. His repeated considerations of why he writes do wear thin, but each one has a small, creatively inspirational gem within. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mrminjares - LibraryThing

This book by Orhan Pamuk was published after he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2006. The title is a reference to the titles of his other books, most of which contain a color in their names. For ... Read full review

Contents

PREFACE
LIVING AND WORRYING
CHAPTER ONEThe Implied Author
CHAPTER TWOMy Father
CHAPTER THREENotes on April 29 1994
CHAPTER FOURSpring Afternoons
CHAPTER FIVEDead Tired in the Evening
CHAPTER SIXOut of Bed in the Silence of Night
CHAPTER FORTYONEReading Thomas Bernhard in a Time of Unhappiness
CHAPTER FORTYTWOThe World of Thomas Bernhards Novels
CHAPTER FORTYTHREEMario Vargas Llosa and Third World Literature
The Satanic Verses and the Freedom of the Writer
POLITICS EUROPE AND OTHER PROBLEMS OF BEING ONESELF
CHAPTER FORTYFIVEPEN Arthur Miller Speech
CHAPTER FORTYSIXNo Entry
CHAPTER FORTYSEVENWhere Is Europe?

CHAPTER SEVENWhen the Furniture Is Talking How Can You Sleep?
CHAPTER EIGHTGiving Up Smoking
CHAPTER NINESeagull in the Rain
CHAPTER TENA Seagull Lies Dying on the Shore
CHAPTER ELEVENTo Be Happy
CHAPTER TWELVEMy Wristwatches
CHAPTER THIRTEENIm Not Going to School
CHAPTER FOURTEENRüya and Us
CHAPTER FIFTEENWhen Rüya Is Sad
CHAPTER SIXTEENThe View
CHAPTER SEVENTEENWhat I Know About Dogs
CHAPTER EIGHTEENA Note on Poetic Justice
CHAPTER NINETEENAfter the Storm
CHAPTER TWENTYIn This Place Long Ago
CHAPTER TWENTYONEThe House of the Man Who Has No One
CHAPTER TWENTYTWOBarbers
CHAPTER TWENTYTHREEFires and Ruins
CHAPTER TWENTYFOURFrankfurter
CHAPTER TWENTYFIVEBosphorus Ferries
CHAPTER TWENTYSIXThe Princes Islands
CHAPTER TWENTYSEVENEarthquake
CHAPTER TWENTYEIGHTEarthquake Angst in Istanbul
BOOKS AND READING
CHAPTER TWENTYNINEHow I Got Rid of Some of My Books
Words or Images
CHAPTER THIRTYONEThe Pleasures of Reading
CHAPTER THIRTYTWONine Notes on Book Covers
The Thousand and One Nights
Everyone Should Have an Uncle Like This
CHAPTER THIRTYFIVEVictor Hugos Passion for Greatness
The Joys of Degradation
CHAPTER THIRTYSEVENDostoyevskys Fearsome Demons
CHAPTER THIRTYEIGHTThe Brothers Karamazov
On Nabokovs Ada and Lolita
CHAPTER FORTYAlbert Camus
CHAPTER FORTYEIGHTA Guide to Being Mediterranean
CHAPTER FORTYNINEMy First Passport and Other European Journeys
CHAPTER FIFTYAndré Gide
CHAPTER FIFTYONEFamily Meals and Politics on Religious Holidays
CHAPTER FIFTYTWOThe Anger of the Damned
CHAPTER FIFTYTHREETraffic and Religion
CHAPTER FIFTYFOURIn Kars and Frankfurt
CHAPTER FIFTYFIVEOn Trial
CHAPTER FIFTYSIXWho Do You Write For?
MY BOOKS ARE MY LIFE
CHAPTER FIFTYSEVENThe White Castle Afterword
Ten Years On
CHAPTER FIFTYNINEA Selection from Interviews on The New Life
CHAPTER SIXTYA Selection from Interviews on My Name Is Red
CHAPTER SIXTYONEOn My Name Is Red
CHAPTER SIXTYTWOFrom the Snow in Kars Notebooks
PICTURES AND TEXTS
CHAPTER SIXTYTHREEŞirins Surprise
CHAPTER SIXTYFOURIn the Forest and as Old as the World
CHAPTER SIXTYFIVEMurders by Unknown Assailants and Detective Novels
CHAPTER SIXTYSIXEntracte or Ah Cleopatra
CHAPTER SIXTYSEVENWhy Didnt I Become an Architect?
CHAPTER SIXTYEIGHTSelimiye Mosque
CHAPTER SIXTYNINEBellini and the East
CHAPTER SEVENTYBlack Pen
CHAPTER SEVENTYONEMeaning
OTHER CITIES OTHER CIVILIZATIONS
CHAPTER SEVENTYTWOMy First Encounters with Americans
CHAPTER SEVENTYTHREEViews from the Capital of the World
THEPARIS REVIEW INTERVIEW
TO LOOK OUT THE WINDOWA Story
MY FATHERS SUITCASEThe Nobel Lecture
PUBLICATION HISTORY
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Orhan Pamuk is the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature for 2006. His novel My Name Is Red won the 2003 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. His work has been translated into more than twenty languages. He lives in Istanbul.


From the Hardcover edition.

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