Other Places: Three Plays

Front Cover
Methuen, 1983 - Drama - 83 pages
Book jacket/back: When this triptich of new plays by Harold Pinter opened in London in October 1982 it was celebrated by critics and audiences alike as an electrifying theatrical event that confirmed once again the author's undisputed place in the forefront of today's dramatists.

"The first two plays in 'Other Places' are strange, comic, ansd fascinating, but you would know they were Pinter if you met them in yoru dreams. However, the third play, 'A Kind of Alaska,' (which strikes me on instant acquaintance as a masterpiece) moves one in a way no work of his has ever done before...Never before have I Known a Pinter play to leave one so emotionally wrung through." Michael Billington, The Guardian. "Harold Pinter is writing at the top of his powers...It has taken some of us time to learn Pinter's language. He was never less obscure than here, or more profoundly eloquent about the fragile joy of being alive." --John Barber, The Daily Telegraph

In "A Kind of Alaska," a middle-aged woman wakes up after nearly thirty years passed in a coma induced by sleeping sickness. "Victoria Station" is a hilarious nocturnal dialogue on a car radio between a lost taxi driver and his controller; "Family Voices," originally broadcast as a radio play and subsequently presented in a "platform performance," is a set of parallel monologues in the form of letters which a mother, son and father may have written to each other but never exchanged.

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About the author (1983)

English playwright, poet, and political activist Harold Pinter was born on October 10, 1930, in London's East End. From childhood he was interested in literature and acting. He studied at both the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts and the Central School of Speech and Drama. Pinter was a Nobel Prize-winning English playwright and screenwriter. One of the most influential modern British dramatists, his writing career spanned more than 50 years. His best-known plays include The Birthday Party (1957), The Homecoming (1964), and Betrayal (1978), each of which he adapted to film. Pinter published his first poems in 1950. He worked as a bit-part actor in a BBC Radio program and also toured with a Shakespearean troupe. Pinter has written over 30 plays, achieving great success internationally. He has also directed several of his dramas. Pinter was married to actress Vivien Merchant from 1956 to 1980, before wedding biographer Lady Antonia Fraser. From his first marriage he has a son who is a writer and musician. Pinter has won numerous prestigious literary prizes in poetry and theatre. He was awarded the Hermann Kesten Medallion for outstanding commitment on behalf of persecuted and imprisoned writers. He has been granted honorary degrees at universities in England, Scotland, the United States, Bulgaria, Ireland, Italy, and Greece. In 2005, Pinter received the Nobel Prize for Literature. He died from cancer on December 24, 2008 at the age of 78.

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