Ottoman Refugees, 1878-1939: Migration in a Post-Imperial World

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A&C Black, Sep 12, 2013 - History - 256 pages
In the first half of the 20th century, throughout the Balkans and Middle East, a familiar story of destroyed communities forced to flee war or economic crisis unfolded. Often, these refugees of the Ottoman Empire - Christians, Muslims and Jews - found their way to new continents, forming an Ottoman diaspora that had a remarkable ability to reconstitute, and even expand, the ethnic, religious, and ideological diversity of their homelands.

Ottoman Refugees, 1878-1939 offers a unique study of a transitional period in world history experienced through these refugees living in the Middle East, the Americas, South-East Asia, East Africa and Europe. Isa Blumi explores the tensions emerging between those trying to preserve a world almost entirely destroyed by both the nation-state and global capitalism and the agents of the so-called Modern era.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Finance Capitalism and the Political Economy of Imperial Collapse
17
The Politics of Caring for Ottoman Refugees
43
3 Traveling the Contours of an Ottoman Proximate World
67
The Global Ottoman Refugee and Colonial Terror
91
5 Missionaries at the Imperial Ideological Edge
115
Conclusion
143
Notes
155
Bibliography
233
Index
267
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About the author (2013)

Isa Blumi is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Area Studies, Leipzig University, Germany and Associate Professor of History at Georgia State University, USA.

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