Ottoman Literature: The Poets and Poetry of Turkey

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Elias John Wilkinson Gibb
M.W. Dunne, 1901 - Turkish poetry - 351 pages
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An anthology of notable poetry and poets in the history of Turkey. Some discussion of the general character, the verse-form, the meters, and the development of Ottoman poetry is included in the beginning of the collection.

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Page 287 - Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away. For, lo, the winter is past, The rain is over and gone ; The flowers appear on the earth ; The time of the singing of birds is come, And the voice of the turtle is heard in our land ; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, And the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Page 296 - Set me as a seal upon thine heart, as a seal upon thine arm : for love is strong as death : jealousy is cruel as the grave: the coals thereof are coals of fire, which hath a most vehement flame.
Page 290 - Spikenard and saffron ; Calamus and cinnamon, With all trees of frankincense ; Myrrh and Aloes, with all the chief spices : A fountain of gardens, A well of living waters, And streams from Lebanon.
Page 291 - I AM come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey ; I have drunk my wine with my milk : Eat, O friends ; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved.
Page 288 - Go forth, O ye daughters of Zion, and behold king Solomon with the crown wherewith his mother crowned him in the day of his espousals, and in the day of the gladness of his heart.
Page 288 - Who is this that cometh out of the wilderness like pillars of smoke, perfumed with myrrh and frankincense, with all powders of the merchant ? Behold His bed, which is Solomon's ; threescore valiant men are about it, of the valiant of Israel.
Page 287 - The voice of my beloved ! behold, he cometh Leaping upon the mountains, skipping upon the hills. My beloved is like a roe or a young hart: Behold, he standeth behind our wall, He looketh forth at the windows, Shewing himself through the lattice.
Page 298 - Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field; let us lodge in the villages. Let us get up early to the vineyards; let us see if the vine flourish, whether the tender grape appear, and the pomegranates bud forth: there will I give thee my loves.
Page 289 - BEHOLD, thou art fair, my love; behold, thou art fair; Thou hast doves' eyes within thy locks : Thy hair is as a flock of goats, that appear from mount Gilead.
Page 287 - O my dove, that art in the clefts of the rock, in the secret places of the stairs, let me see thy countenance, let me hear thy voice; for sweet is thy voice, and thy countenance is comely.

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