Our Arctic Province: Alaska and the Seal Islands

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C. Scribner's sons, 1886 - Alaska - 473 pages
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Page 251 - Second. Through the action of the intelligent business men who took the contract from the Government, in stimulating and encouraging the dressers of the raw material, and in taking sedulous care that nothing but good skins should leave the islands, and in combination with leaders of fashion abroad, the demand for the fur, by this- manipulation and management, has been wonderfully increased. Third. As matters now stand, the greatest and best interests of the lessees are identical with those of the...
Page 251 - Third. As matters now stand, the greatest and best interests of the lessees are identical with those of the government; what injures one injures the other. In other words, both strive to guard against anything that shall interfere with the preservation of the seallife in its original integrity, and both having it to their interest if possible to increase that life; if the lessees had it in their power, which they certainly have not, to ruin these interests by a few seasons of rapacity, they are so...
Page 156 - Now far he sweeps, where scarce a summer smiles, On Behring's rocks, or Greenland's naked isles : Cold on his midnight watch the breezes blow, From wastes that slumber in eternal snow ; And waft, across the waves' tumultuous roar, The wolf's long howl from Oonalaska's shore.
Page 252 - ... sun; what is done is known to everybody, and the tax now laid by the Government upon, and paid into the Treasury every year by the Alaska Commercial Company, yields alone a handsome rate of interest on the entire purchase money expended for the ownership of all Alaska.
Page 304 - The male does not get his full growth and weight until the close of his seventh year, but realizes most of it, osteologically speaking, by the end of the fifth; and from this it may be perhaps truly inferred that the...
Page 273 - ... remarkable enough, but it is simply wonderful when we come to associate the condition with the unceasing activity, restlessness, and duty devolved upon the bulls as heads and fathers of large families. They do not stagnate, like bears in caves ; it is evidently accomplished or due to the absorption of their own fat, with which they are so liberally supplied when they take their positions on the breeding-ground, and which gradually diminishes while they remain on it. But still some most remarkable...
Page 269 - English whaling and sealing parties for many years, and the characteristic features of the seals themselves so suit the naming, that I have felt satisfied to retain the style throughout as rendering my description more intelligible, especially so to those who are engaged in the business, or may be hereafter. The Russians are more consistent, but not so " pat ", they call the " bull " " see-catch ", a term implying strength, vigor, etc.; the cow " matkah ", or mother; the pups, " kotickie ", or little...
Page 251 - ... that prudence prevents it. "Fourth. The frequent changes in the office of the secretary of the treasury, who has very properly the absolute control of the business as it stands, do not permit upon his part of that close, careful scrutiny which is exercised by the lessees, who, unlike him, have but their one purpose to carry out. The character of the leading men among them is enough to assure the public that the business is in responsible hands, and in the care of persons who will use every effort...
Page 242 - I can say that they do not drink less than a gallon of tea apiece per diem. The amount of this beverage which they sip, from the time they rise in the morning until they go to bed late at night, is astounding. Their "samovars...
Page 279 - ... his full height, look me directly and defiantly in the face, roaring and spitting most vehemently. The cows, however, soon got away from him, but he still stood his ground, making little charges on me of ten or fifteen feet in a succession of gallops or lunges, spitting furiously and then retreating to the old position, back of which he would not go, fully resolved to hold his own or die in the attempt. This courage is all the more noteworthy from the fact that, in regard to man, it is invariably...

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