Our Daily Meds: How the Pharmaceutical Companies Transformed Themselves Into Slick Marketing Machines and Hooked the Nation on Prescription Drugs

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Macmillan, Mar 3, 2009 - Business & Economics - 448 pages
2 Reviews

An "angrily illuminating" (The New York Times) exposť of Big Pharma's corrupting influence in America today

In the last thirty years, pharmaceutical companies have seized control of American medicine by putting their marketers in charge. They invent diseases in order to sell the pills that "cure" them. They sway doctors by giving them resort vacatopms, gourmet meals, and fistfuls of cash. They advertise prescription drugs at NASCAR races, on subways, and even in churches. Medicines can save lives, but the relentless promotion of these products has come at tremendous cost. Prescription pills taken as directed are estimated to kill one American every five minutes. More Americans are addicted to medications than cocaine. And roads have become less safe as the over-medicated take to the wheel. In Our Daily Meds, journalist Melody Petersen connects the dots to show how subtle, far-reaching, and dangerous Big Pharma's powers have become.

 

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Our daily meds: how the pharmaceutical companies transformed themselves into slick marketing machines and hooked the nation on prescription drugs

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Justifying her sensationalist title with thorough documentation, award-winning business journalist Petersen, who spent four years covering the pharmaceutical beat for the New York Times, presents a ... Read full review

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The book was read by a journalist rather than a scientist. My impression on it is like reading a story instead of a scientific report, which is more logic, laconic, methodic, and direct. The only part I like to read is the second part which I found is broader, retrospective, and conclusive. The first part and third one are too fragmentary and long-winded. However, I like the book very much. It reports us a ugly world and dirty facts. If the author could list some positive achievements big pharms offer us, it would be more subjective and more persuasive. Big pharms are neither saints nor Bilial.  

Contents

Introduction
3
RX REPUBLIC
13
Creating Disease
15
Midwestern Medicine Show
38
Chemical Imbalance
80
THE RISE OF THE MEDICINE MERCHANTS
113
The Early Years
115
An Awakening The Age of the Blockbuster
133
A BITTER PILL
253
Altered State
255
Deadly Doses
294
Epilogue
316
NOTES
339
BIBLIOGRAPHY
409
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
413
INDEX
415

Ghostwriters and Secret Studies
173
Neurontin for Everything
212

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About the author (2009)

Melody Petersen wrote about the pharmaceutical industry for four years as a reporter for The New York Times. She lives with her husband in Los Angeles.

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