Our Dramatic Heritage: The Golden Age

Front Cover
Philip George Hill
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 1983 - Drama - 624 pages
This book is the second in a multi-volume series that illustrates the development of European drama from its beginning in ancient Greece to the mid-twentieth century. The full flowering of the Renaissance, the "Golden Age, " is reserved for this volume with the plays of England, Spain, and France setting the high standard by which European drama has been measured ever since.
 

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Contents

Section 1
65
Section 2
68
Section 3
86
Section 4
93
Section 5
114
Section 6
117
Section 7
158
Section 8
161
Section 19
415
Section 20
417
Section 21
453
Section 22
456
Section 23
477
Section 24
491
Section 25
494
Section 26
525

Section 9
217
Section 10
220
Section 11
225
Section 12
240
Section 13
279
Section 14
282
Section 15
324
Section 16
327
Section 17
377
Section 18
380
Section 27
528
Section 28
529
Section 29
559
Section 30
564
Section 31
566
Section 32
584
Section 33
589
Section 34
592
Section 35
627

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Page 52 - My late ambition hath distain'd 16 my faith; My breach of faith occasion'd bloody wars; Those bloody wars have spent my treasure; And with my treasure my people's blood; And with their blood, my joy and best belov'd, My best belov'd, my sweet and only son.
Page 57 - Now to these favours will I add reward, Not with fair words, but store of golden coin, And lands and living join'd with dignities, If thou but satisfy my just demand.
Page 48 - And begged that only she might give my doom. Pluto was pleased, and sealed it with a kiss. 80 Forthwith, Revenge, she rounded thee in th'ear, And bade thee lead me through the gates of horn, Where dreams have passage in the silent night. No sooner had she spoke but we were here, I wot not how, in twinkling of an eye.
Page 50 - It was, my liege, the prince of Portingale. KING. But what was he that on the other side Held him by th' arm, as partner of the prize?
Page 57 - In time the savage bull sustains the yoke, In time all haggard hawks will stoop to lure, In time small wedges cleave the hardest oak, In time the flint is pierc'd with softest shower, And she in time will fall from her disdain, And rue the suffrance of your friendly pain.
Page 59 - But such a war as breaks no bond of peace. Speak thou fair words, I'll cross them with fair words; Send thou sweet looks, I'll meet them with sweet looks; Write loving lines, I'll answer loving lines; Give me a kiss, I'll countercheck thy kiss: Be this our warring peace, or peaceful war. HORATIO But gracious madam, then appoint the field Where trial of this war shall first be made.
Page 54 - But wrathful Nemesis, that wicked power, Envying at Andrea's praise and worth, Cut short his life, to end his praise and worth. She, she herself, disguis'd...
Page 54 - Which paunch'd his horse, and ding'd him to the ground. Then young Don Balthazar with ruthless rage, Taking advantage of his foe's distress, Did finish what his halberdiers begun, And left not, till Andrea's life was done.
Page 54 - And, madam, Don Horatio will not slack Humbly to serve fair Bel-imperia.
Page 56 - ANDREA Come we for this from depth of underground, To see him feast that gave me my death's wound? These pleasant sights are sorrow to my soul, Nothing but league, and love, and banqueting! REVENGE Be still Andrea, ere we go from hence, I'll turn their friendship into fell despite, Their love to mortal hate, their day to night, Their hope into despair, their peace to war, Their joys to pain, their bliss to misery.

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