Our Elusive Constitution: Silences, Paradoxes, Priorities

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SUNY Press, 1997 - Law - 297 pages
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This volume explores the relationship between religion and politics. It brings a varied sample of richly detailed comparative and case studies together with a set of analytical paradigms in an integrated framework. It is a major statement on a timely subject, and a plea for the acknowledgment of normative pluralism as firmly rooted in the history of religion. The editor shows that the fact of political diversity in the history of world religions compels the acceptance of pluralism as a normative principle.
 

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Contents

The Myth of the Political Question
13
Representation and Constitutional Politics
47
The Many Against Nationalism
79
Peoplehood and Nationalism
85
The Myth of Presidential Prerogative
105
Compelling Governmental Interests
129
The One Against Positivism
157
Personhood and Rights
161
What Makes a Right Fundamental
177
Rights We Need Today
195
Afterword
233
Notes
235
Bibliography
265
Index
283
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About the author (1997)

Said Amir Arjomand is Professor of Sociology at State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is the author of a number of books, including Authority and Culture in Shi'ism, published by SUNY Press, and the editor of the SUNY Press Series in Near Eastern Studies.

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