Our Right to Drugs: The Case for a Free Market

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Syracuse University Press, Apr 1, 1996 - Medical - 228 pages
In Our Right to Drugs, Szasz shows how the present drug war started at the beginning of this century, when the US government first assumed the task of protecting people from patent medicines. By the end of World War I the free market in drugs was but a dim memory. Instead of dwelling on the familiar impracticality and unfairness of drug laws, Szasz demonstrates the deleterious effects of prescription laws, which place people under lifelong medical supervision. The result is that most Americans today prefer a coercive and corrupt command drug economy to a free market in drugs.
 

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OUR RIGHT TO DRUGS: The Case for a Free Market

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Szasz (Psychiatry/SUNY at Syracuse) at his abrasive best, skewering the shibboleths of the War On Drugs and giving historical context to the current national hubbub. The prohibition of drugs abrogates ... Read full review

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This book is full of pure wisdom. It cites Lysander Spooner's "Vices Are Not Crimes," tracing anti-prohibitionist thought back to the abolitionist movement. Highly recommended for those who wish to experience the thought of an American individualist.

Contents

The Right We Rejected
1
Liberty vs Utopia
31
Drugs as Scapegoats
59
The Cult of Drug Disinformation
77
The Lie of Legalization
95
Crack as Genocide
111
The Perils of Prohibition
125
The Burden of Choice
145
Notes
165
Bibliography
185
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