Our Naval War with France

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Houghton Mifflin, 1909 - United States - 323 pages
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Page 294 - February, 1778, the treaty of amity and commerce of the same date, and the convention of the 14th of November, 1788, nor upon the indemnities mutually due or claimed, the parties will negotiate further on these subjects at a convenient time...
Page 294 - ... shall address themselves to the courts, judges, and officers competent, and shall demand the said deserters in writing^ proving by an exhibition of the registers of the...
Page 5 - ... it is the right of every nation to prohibit acts of sovereignty from being exercised by any other within its limits ; and the duty of a neutral nation to prohibit such as would injure one of the warring powers...
Page 291 - It shall not be lawful for any foreign privateers, not belonging to subjects of the Most Christian King nor citizens of the said United States, who have commissions from any other Prince or State in enmity with either nation, to fit their ships in the ports of either the one or the other of the aforesaid parties...
Page 38 - I will never send another minister to France without assurances that he will be received, respected, and honored as the representative of a great, free, powerful, and independent nation.
Page 297 - No shelter or refuge shall be given in their ports to such as have made a prize upon the subjects or citizens of either of the said parties...
Page 40 - United States. Thinking in this manner, and feeling how incumbent it is upon every person, of every description, to contribute at all times to his country's welfare, and especially in a moment like the present, when every thing we hold dear and sacred is so seriously threatened, I have finally determined to accept the commission of Commander-in-Chief of the Armies of the United States...
Page 291 - ... also from one place belonging to an enemy to another place belonging to an enemy, whether they be under the jurisdiction of one power or under several.
Page 2 - The two parties guarantee mutually from the present time and forever against all other powers, to wit: The United States to His Most Christian Majesty, the present possessions of the Crown of France in America, as well as those which it may acquire by the future treaty of peace...
Page 292 - If the ships of the said subjects, people, or inhabitants, of either of the parties, shall be met with, either sailing along the coasts or on the high seas, by any ship of war of the other, or by any privateer, the said ship of war or privateer...

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