Our town: a play in three acts

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Coward McCann, Inc., 1938 - Drama - 128 pages
3 Reviews
Drama / 17m, 7f, extras / Bare StageIn an important publishing event, Samuel French, in cooperation with the Thornton Wilder estate is pleased to release the playwright's definitive version of Our Town. This edition of the play differs only slightly from previous acting editions, yet it presents the version of Our Town as Thornton Wilder wished it performed. Described by Edward Albee as ...the greatest American play ever written, the story follows the small town of Grover's Corners through three acts: Daily Life, Love and Marriage, and Death and Eternity. Narrated by a stage manager and performed with minimal props and sets, audiences follow the Webb and Gibbs families as their children fall in love, marry, and eventually-in one of the most famous scenes in American theatre-die. Thornton Wilder's final word on how he wanted his play performed is an invaluable addition to the American stage and to the libraries of theatre lovers internationally.While all of Wilder's work is intelligent, non-synthetic and often moving, as well as funny, it is Our Town that makes the difference. It is probably the finest play ever written by an American. - Edward Albee Thornton Wilder's masterpiece...An immortal tale of small town morality [and]...a classic of soft spoken theater. - The New York Times

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Our Town

User Review  - ebaker - Borders

While some authors use superfluous details and descriptions, Thornton Wilder does quite the opposite in his play Our Town. The simple language and straightforward plot used in this play about a small ... Read full review

Review: Our Town

User Review  - Ly Do - Goodreads

Most people (I've met) found this book boring. Not tedious. It wasn't that long. The play has three sections which I can easily named: Birth, Life and Death. What is so significant about this play is ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
37
Section 2
66
Section 3
87
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About the author (1938)

One of the most honored and versatile of modern writers, Thornton Wilder combined a career as a successful novelist with work for the theater that made him one of this century's outstanding dramatists. It was an early short novel, however, that first brought him fame. The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1927), a bestseller that won the Pulitzer Prize in 1927, is the story of a group of assorted people who happen to be on a bridge in Peru when it collapses. Ingeniously constructed and rich in its philosophical implications about fate and synchronicity, Wilder's book would seem to be the first well-known example of a formula that has become a cliche in popular literature. His attraction to classical themes is manifested in The Woman of Andros (1930), a tragedy about young love in pre-Christian Greece, and The Ides of March (1948), set in the time of Julius Caesar and told in letters and documents covering a long span of years. Heaven's My Destination (1934), is a seriocomic and picaresque story about a young book salesman traveling through the Midwest during the early years of the Great Depression.Theophilus North (1973), Wilder's last novel, disappointed many reviewers, but it provided its author with opportunities to offer some wry observations on the life of the idle rich in Newport during the summer of 1926 and to ponder in the story of his alter ego what might have happened if Wilder had stayed home, so to speak, instead of becoming Thornton Wilder. As a serious writer of fiction, Wilder's main claim rests on The Eighth Day (1967), an intellectual thriller, which the N.Y. Times called "the most substantial fiction of his career." It won the National Book Award for fiction in 1968.

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