Out of Place: Restoring Identity to the Regional Landscape

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Yale University Press, 1990 - Architecture - 230 pages
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Why do modern cities, suburbs, and industrial and farming landscapes all tend to look alike despite their regional settings? In this generously illustrated and provocative book, a landscape architect argues that the monotony of the modern landscape is a reflection of indifference on the part of society to the diversity inherent in ecological systems and in human communities. In case studies drawn from all parts of the world--Turkey and Hong Kong to northern England and Edinburgh, to Kentucky and Oregon, to Ontario and Manitoba--Michael Hough shows how build environments work and what designers can do to maintain the clearly identifiable differences between one place and another.
 

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Contents

The Native Landscape and Human Perceptions
20
Regional Identity by Necessity
34
Ideals and Visions
59
The Urban Region and the Loss of Identity
85
Industrial Landscapes and Environmental Perceptions
122
Searching for the Differences
149
Principles for Regional Design
179
Notes 2
213
Index
227
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