Outlaw Representation: Censorship & Homosexuality in Twentieth-century American Art

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Beacon Press, 2002 - Art - 376 pages
From the U.S. Navy's 1934 confiscation of a painting of sailors on shore leave to contemporary culture wars over funding for the arts, conflicts surrounding homosexuality and creative freedom have shaped the history of modern art in America. Richard Meyer's Outlaws Representation tells the charged story of this strife through pioneering analysis of the works of gay artists and the circumstances under which these works have been attacked, suppressed, or censored outright. Focusing on the careers of Paul Cadmus, Andy Warhol, Robert Mapplethorpe, David Wojnarowicz, Gran Fury, and Holly Hughes, Outlaw Representation explores how gay artists responded to the threat of censorship by producing their own "outlaw representations" of homosexuality. Instead of acquiescing to attacks on their work as indecent or obscene, these artists used the outlaw status of homosexuality to propose new forms of social, sexual, and creative life.
 

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Contents

Section 1
36
Section 2
58
Section 3
59
Section 4
74
Section 5
81
Section 6
84
Section 7
85
Section 8
91
Section 19
175
Section 20
182
Section 21
191
Section 22
193
Section 23
195
Section 24
197
Section 25
204
Section 26
211

Section 9
106
Section 10
119
Section 11
137
Section 12
148
Section 13
152
Section 14
155
Section 15
163
Section 16
164
Section 17
167
Section 18
172
Section 27
212
Section 28
229
Section 29
232
Section 30
236
Section 31
259
Section 32
262
Section 33
268
Section 34
274
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Richard Meyer is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Southern California.

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