Outline of the Philosophy of English Literature, Part 1

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Ginn, 1895 - English literature - 266 pages
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Page 186 - I bid thee, if ever I may see thee, I shall slay thee with mine own hands ; for thou wouldst for my rich sword see me dead.
Page 185 - With that they saw a damsel going upon the lake : What damsel is that ? said Arthur. That is the Lady of the lake, said Merlin ; and within that lake is a rock, and therein is as fair a place as any on earth, and richly beseen, and this damsel will come to you anon, and then speak ye fair to her that she will give you that sword.
Page 186 - If I throw this rich sword in the water, thereof shall never come good, but harm and loss.
Page 276 - By mail, $1.10; for introduction, $1.00. rpHK leading purpose of this volume is to introduce the student to the aesthetic and organic character of English Verse — to cultivate his susceptibility to verse as an inseparable part of poetic expression. To this end, the various effects provided for by the poet, either consciously or unconsciously on his part, are given for the student to practice upon, until those effects come out distinctly to his feelings. JH Gilmore, Prof, of inglish, University...
Page 185 - So they rode till they came to a lake, the which was a fair water and broad, and in the midst of the lake Arthur was ware of an arm clothed in white samite, that held a fair sword in that hand. Lo, said Merlin, yonder is that sword that I spake of. With that they saw a damsel going upon the lake : What damsel is that ? said Arthur. That is the Lady of the lake...
Page 259 - There is one that passeth all the other, and is the most diligent prelate and preacher in all England. And will ye know who it is? I will tell you: it is the devil. He is the most diligent preacher of all other; he is never out of his diocese...
Page 186 - Lucan would grieve me evermore; but my time hieth fast, said the king. Therefore, said Arthur unto Sir Bedivere, take thou Excalibur, my good sword, and go with it to yonder water side, and when thou comest there I charge thee throw my sword in that water, and come again and tell me what thou there seest. My lord, said Bedivere, your commandment shall be done, and lightly bring you word again.
Page 185 - And there was all the hall full filled with good odours, and every knight had such meats and drinks as he best loved in this world...
Page 187 - And when they were at the water side, even fast by the bank hoved a little barge with many fair ladies in it, and among them all was a queen, and all they had black hoods, and all they wept and shrieked when they saw King Arthur. Now put me into the barge, said the king.
Page 259 - And now I would ask a strange question : who is the most diligent bishop and prelate in all England, that passeth all the rest in doing his office? I can tell, for I know him who it is; I know him well. But now I think I see you listening and hearkening that I should name him. There is one that passeth all the other, and is the most diligent prelate and preacher in all England.

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