Outlines of Economics

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Macmillan, 1910 - Economics - 700 pages
 

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Page 374 - The natural price of labour is that price which is necessary to enable the labourers, one with another, to subsist and to perpetuate their race, without either increase or diminution.
Page 85 - Whereas it is necessary for the support of government, for the discharge of the debts of the United States, and the encouragement and protection of manufactures, that duties be laid on goods, wares, and merchandises imported: Be it enacted, etc.
Page 42 - Every individual is continually exerting himself to find out the most advantageous employment for whatever capital he can command. It is his own advantage, indeed, and not that of the society, which he has in view. But the study of his own advantage naturally, or rather necessarily leads him to prefer that employment which is most advantageous to the society.
Page 42 - What is the species of domestic industry which his capital can employ, and of which the produce is likely to be of the greatest value, every individual, it is evident, can, in his local situation, judge much better than any statesman or lawgiver can do for him.
Page 188 - Perpetuities and monopolies are contrary to the genius of a free government, and shall never be allowed; nor shall the law of primogeniture or entailments ever be in force in this state.
Page 590 - ... agent of any person, corporation, or syndicate in making such entry, nor in collusion with any person, corporation, or syndicate to give them the benefit of the land entered, or any part thereof, or the timber thereon...
Page 228 - It is evident that if the opportunity for the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1 had still existed, there would have been another sudden change in the actual monetary standard.
Page 85 - ... the passage of the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 and the Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890, and for the fervor of the Populist movement of the early nineties.
Page 80 - The western States (I speak now from my own observation) stand as it were upon a pivot. The touch of a feather would turn them any way.
Page 118 - The things which have the greatest value in use have frequently little or no value in exchange; and on the contrary, those which have the greatest value in exchange have frequently little or no value in use. Nothing is more useful than water: but it will purchase scarce anything; scarce anything can be had in exchange for it.

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