Outlines of Greek and Roman Medicine

Forsideomslag
Bale, 1914 - 165 sider
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Side 108 - It was begun about the end of the fifth, or the beginning of the sixth century...
Side 25 - I will give no deadly medicine to anyone if asked, nor suggest any such counsel, and in like manner I will not give to a woman a pessary to produce abortion.
Side 26 - Whatever, in connection with my professional practice, or not in connection with it, I see or hear, in the life of men, which ought not to be spoken abroad, I will not divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept secret.
Side 2 - They acknowledged that the true principles of social life, laws, agriculture, and science, which had been first invented by the wisdom of Athens, were now firmly established by the power of Rome, under whose auspicious influence the fiercest barbarians were united by an equal government and common language.
Side 111 - Justinian and his successors", first appeared in the neighbourhood of Pelusium, between the Serbonian bog and the eastern channel of the Nile. From thence, tracing as it were a double path, it spread to the East, over Syria, Persia, and the Indies, and penetrated to the West, along the coast of Africa, and over the continent of Europe. In...
Side 25 - I will keep this oath and stipulation - to reckon him who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my substance with him, and relieve his necessities if required; to look upon his offspring...
Side 24 - ... through the cities, be esteemed physicians not only in name but in reality. But inexperience is a bad treasure, and a bad fund to those who possess it, whether in opinion or reality, being devoid of self-reliance and contentedness, and the nurse both of timidity and audacity. For timidity betrays a want of powers, and audacity a want of skill. There are, indeed, two things, knowledge and opinion, of which the one makes its possessor really to know, the other to be ignorant.
Side 25 - Art, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, and every other mode of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of the Art to my own sons, and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, but to none others. I will follow that system of regimen which, according to my abili ty and judgment, I consider for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous.
Side 162 - Breathing Exercises. For use after Removal of Postnasal Growths (Adenoids). By DUNCAN MATHESON MACKAY, MD, Senior Clinical Assistant, Hospital for Diseases of the Throat, Golden Square. Adapted from the Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on the Model Course of Physical Exercises, 1904 (by permission of the Controller of His Majesty's Stationery Office), and rearranged with modifications and additions.
Side 17 - But four prolific principles to hold, Four different bodies ; two to heaven ascend, And other two down to the centre tend. Fire, first, with wings expanded mounts...

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