Outlines of Oryctology: An Introduction to the Study of Fossil Organic Remains; Especially of Those Found in the British Strata: Intended to Aid the Student in His Inquiries Respecting the Nature of Fossils, and Their Connections with the Formation of the Earth ...

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The author, 1822 - Paleontology - 346 pages
 

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Page 328 - The den is a natural fissure or cavern in oolitic limestone extending 300 feet into the body of the solid rock, and varying from two to five feet in height and breadth. Its mouth was closed with rubbish, and overgrown with grass and bushes, and was accidentally intersected by the working of a stone quarry.
Page 332 - The general dispersion of bones of the same animals through the diluvian gravel of high latitudes, over great part of the northern hemisphere, shows that the period in which they inhabited these regions was that immediately preceding the formation of this gravel, and that they perished by the same waters which produced it. M. Cuvier...
Page 314 - The common African rhinoceros has a crooked horn resembling a cock's spur, which rises about nine or ten inches above the nose and inclines backward ; immediately behind this is a short thick horn ; but the head they brought had a straight horn projecting three feet from the forehead, about ten inches above the tip of the nose. The projection of this great horn very much resembles that of the fanciful unicorn in the British arms. It has a small thick horny substance, eight inches long, immediately...
Page 330 - ... caves of rocks which it inhabits. This analogy explains the accumulation of the bones in the den at Kirkdale. They were carried in for food by the hyaenas ; the smaller animals, perhaps, entire; the larger ones piecemeal ; for by no other means could the : bones of such large animals as the elephant and rhinoceros have arrived at the inmost recesses of so small a hole, unless rolled thither by water; in which case, the angles would have been worn off by attrition, but they are not.
Page 12 - ... or root growing in a direction nearly horizontal in the soft mud at the bottom of freshwater lakes or seas, without branches, but sending out fibres from all sides; that it was furnished in the centre with a pith of a structure different from the surrounding wood or cellular substance, more dense and distinct at the older end of the plant...
Page 328 - The bottom of the cavern is nearly horizontal, and is entirely covered to the depth of about a foot with a sediment of mud deposited by the deluvian waters.
Page 336 - The several breaks and faults in the stratified masses, and the various inclinations of the strata, as well as the vast abruptions by which these several substances are brought to the hand of man, may be regarded as most beneficent provisions resulting from catastrophes too vast and tremendous for human intellect to comprehend, ' From these several creations, it appears that beings have proceeded, gradually increasing in superiority, from testaceous animals to reptiles, marine and fresh water amphibia,...
Page 328 - ... elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus, horse, ox, two or three species of deer, bear, fox, waterrat, and birds. The bones are for the most part broken and gnawed to pieces, and the teeth lie loose among the fragments of the bones...
Page 330 - ... genera that live exclusively in warm climates, and which are found associated together only in the Southern portions of Africa near the Cape. It is certain from the evidence afforded by the interior of the den (which is of the same kind with that afforded by the ruins of Herculaneum and Pompeii) that all these animals lived and died in Yorkshire, in the period immediately preceding the deluge...
Page 330 - Pompeii) that all these animals lived and died in Yorkshire, in the period immediately preceding the deluge ; and a similar conclusion may be drawn with respect to England generally, and to those other extensive regions of the northern hemisphere, where the diluvian gravel contains the remains of similar species of animals.

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