Oversight on Occupational Disease Risk Assessment: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Health and Safety and the Subcommittee on Labor Standards of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, Ninety-ninth Congress, First Session, Hearing Held in Washington, DC, on July 17, 1985

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Page 53 - Each employer — (1) shall furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees ; (2) shall comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under this Act.
Page 44 - Administration (OSHA), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission (OSHRC).
Page 60 - The often inadequate communication between those who generate and interpret risk assessment data, those who are responsible for public policy decisionmaking, and those who must consider whether to assume these risks, has at times 360 been responsible for temporary setbacks in enhancing the accurate perception of risks in the workplace.
Page 7 - I am assistant professor of community medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine of the City University of New York. As a...
Page 20 - We believe that this bill is essential in successfully addressing the complex set of problems associated with occupational disease in the United States. As you are well aware, millions of workers are regularly and needlessly exposed to toxic chemicals, wastes, fumes, dusts, and industrial processes as an integral part of their jobs. Over time, such exposure causes a variety of occupationally-related diseases, such as cancer, heart disease, nervous and brain disorders, reproductive damage, miscarriages,...
Page 43 - ... building a reference library. Dictionaries do not have all the words and terms a translator needs, nor do they contain all the information which specialized references may have. There are aids for translators put out by certain organizations, and there is professional literature in every field. In recent years there has been a growing awareness of the need for terminology management...
Page 22 - DoD's operations are subject to the same environmental, safety and health laws and regulations as private industry. These laws include the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act., the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, and the Federal Facilities Compliance Act to name a few. Many of these have provisions for civil and criminal penalties....
Page 28 - In the fall of last year, a paper prepared by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the...
Page 20 - ... compensation systems. The exposed worker populations include millions of workers exposed to cancer-causing substances or processes, including: o 3 million workers exposed to benzene, with a risk of leukemia up to five times greater than normal; o 2.5 million workers exposed to asbestos, many with a risk of lung cancer five times greater than normal...
Page 25 - It also requires the Secretary of HHS to undertake additional research to identify and define additional worker populations at risk of occupational disease.

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