Ozark Magic and Folklore

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, Jan 1, 1964 - Social Science - 367 pages
This basic study by a renowned folklorist includes eye-opening information on yarb doctors, charms, spells, witches, ghosts, weather magic, crops and livestock, courtship and marriage, pregnancy and childbirth, animals and plants, death and burial, household superstitions, and much more.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Dead_Dreamer - LibraryThing

This is a classic study on backwoods folk-magick. It was originally written in the 40s, so the author was able to interview folks who lived in the 1800s. The author lived in the Ozarks (one of the few ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

Bewitched by the water witching, the yarns, tall tales and ghost stories of the Ozarks. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
CROPS AND LIVESTOCK 84
34
HOUSEHOLD SUPERSTITIONS
53
WATER WITCHES
82
the Witch doctors
121
COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE
162
PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH
192
GHOST STORIES
211
ANIMALS AND PLANTS
240
OZARK WITCHCRAFT
264
DEATH AND BURLAL 801
301
LHSCELLANEOUSITEMS 828
343
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1964)

Noted folklorist Vance Randolph was born in Pittsburg, Kansas. After attending college at Kansas State Teachers College, Clark University, and the University of Kansas, he worked as a staff writer for Appeal to Reason, as an assistant instructor in psychology at the University of Kansas, and as a scenario writer for MGM studios in California before devoting all of his time to freelance writing. Randolph is perhaps one of America's most prolific collectors of folk tales, and he is especially renowned for his study of the Ozarks and that region's ribald folk literature. Because of their bawdy nature, many collectors and compilers have passed over such tales from this region, but Randolph compiled many of them in a work entitled Pissing in the Snow and Other Ozark Folk Tales (1976). His regional specialization has led to a number of other works, including The Ozarks: An American Survival of Primitive Society (1931), From an Ozark Mountain Holler: Stories of Ozark Mountain Folk (1933), Ozark Superstitions (1947), and Sticks in the Knapsack and Other Ozark Folk Tales (1958). Regarding his work on the Ozarks, critics have said that Randolph "gives a sensitive portrayal of a fast-vanishing breed of people . . . [and] insight to a way of life that is rapidly passing" (Choice).

Bibliographic information