PGP & GPG: Email for the Practical Paranoid

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No Starch Press, 2006 - Computers - 216 pages
2 Reviews
Governments worldwide, major manufacturers, medical facilities, and many of the smartest computer experts around trust their secure communications to PGP (Pretty Good Privacy). But, while PGP works amazingly when all is in order, it isn’t always easy to configure and can be very tricky to troubleshoot. And email security is hardly the sort of thing you want to leave to chance.

PGP & GPG: Email for the Practical Paranoid is for moderately skilled geeks who are unfamiliar with public-key cryptography but who want to protect their communications on the cheap. Author Michael Lucas offers this easy-to-read, informal tutorial on PGP, so you can dive in right away.

Inside, you’ll learn:

* How to integrate OpenPGP with the most common email clients (like Outlook and Thunderbird)
* How to use the tricky command-line versions of these programs
* How to join and use the Web of Trust

If you're not using PGP yet, this book supplies the confidence you need to get started. And if you are, it will show you how to use these tools more easily and effectively.
 

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This is a very good book for learning GPG.
It consistently shed light and paved the way where others couldn't.

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
xv
INTRODUCTION
1
CHAPTER 1 CRYPTOGRAPGHY KINDERGARTEN
13
CHAPTER 2 UNDERSTANDING OPENPGP
27
CHAPTER 3 INSTALLING PGP
39
CHAPTER 4 INSTALLING GNUPG
53
CHAPTER 5 THE WEB OF TRUST
81
CHAPTER 6 PGP KEY MANAGEMENT
91
CHAPTER 8 OPENPGP AND EMAIL
115
CHAPTER 9 PGP AND EMAIL
125
CHAPTER 10 GNUPG AND EMAIL
137
CHAPTER 11 OTHER OPENPGP CONSIDERATIONS
155
APPENDIX A INTRODUCTION TO PGP COMMAND LINE
167
APPENDIX B GNUPG COMMAND LINE SUMMARY
177
INDEX
183
Copyright

CHAPTER 7 MANAGING GNUPG KEYS
99

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Page 15 - Confidentiality is the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of a "secret code.

About the author (2006)

Michael W. Lucas is a network/security engineer with extensive experience working with high-availability systems. He is the author of the critically acclaimed Absolute BSD, Absolute OpenBSD, and Cisco Routers for the Desperate.

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