Pacific Connections: The Making of the U.S.-Canadian Borderlands

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University of California Press, Jun 12, 2012 - History - 271 pages
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Pacific Connections is a shrewd, fascinating, and cogent examination of a Pacific Northwest borderland often taken for granted as a peaceful but inconsequential meeting point between two friendly nations. Chang shows instead how it has been a violent point of contention, shaped by empire and Anglo-American aspirations to hegemony, migration and ubiquitous racism, the creation of boundaries through state formation, and the transgression of those boundaries by the mechanisms of capital. Sharply written and deeply researched, this book brings the Pacific Northwest into both the history of the Pacific World and the literature on borderlands that has until now focused largely on the U.S. and Mexico. Pacific Connections is a brilliant achievement.”—Bruce Cumings, author of Dominion From Sea to Sea: Pacific Ascendancy and American Power.

"This wonderful book combines impressive archival research with a strong grounding in migration studies, political economy, cultural studies, and critical race studies. Chang examines weighty questions through compelling human dramas set in far-flung places across the Pacific Rim. This is transnational history at its best."—David Roediger, coauthor of The Production of Difference.

"Kornel Chang grapples with big ideas and big questions. Tracing the global movements behind racial and national borders and unraveling the messy contradictions of empire at the dawn of the twentieth century, Pacific Connections explores a history that continues to haunt us, with particular resonance in our current moment."—Moon-Ho Jung, author of Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor, and Sugar in the Age of Emancipation.

Pacific Connections is a capacious study that recasts the U.S.-Canadian borderlands as a crucial site of migration, trade, and exclusion within the formation of Pacific empire. Chang shows how Chinese merchants, Japanese and European migrants, indigenous traders, Anglo labor activists, and both South Asian and white radicals played important roles in the negotiations of sovereignty.”—Lisa Lowe, Professor of Comparative Literature, University of California, San Diego.
 

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Contents

9780520271685_Intro
1
9780520271685_ch01
17
9780520271685_ch02
54
9780520271685_ch03
89
9780520271685_ch04
117
9780520271685_ch05
147
9780520271685_Epilo
179
9780520271685_Notes
193
9780520271685_Bibilo
237
9780520271685_Index
253
9780520271685_Series
269
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About the author (2012)

Kornel Chang is Assistant Professor of History at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, in Newark.

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