Pacific Empires: Essays in Honour of Glyndwr Williams

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UBC Press, 1999 - History - 334 pages
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A new interest in European maritime exploration was aroused with the publication of the first volume of J.C. Beaglehole's edition of The Journals of Captain James Cook in 1955. In the forty-odd years since then, our knowledge of this exploration -- and of the imperialism of which it was a part -- has expanded enormously. We now recognise that the scientific endeavours, once seen as disinterested manifestations of the Enlightenment, actually had both strategic and commercial implications. And today much greater emphasis is given to the meanings of early encounters for both the Natives of the Pacific islands and the Strangers from the European world.
 

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Contents

Explorations Imperial and Scientific Ventures
11
The Spanish Yoke
33
Alexander Dalrymple and the Hydrographic Office
53
An Empire of Science
69
John Lort Stokes and the New Zealand Survey
87
A Warrant Officer in the Arctic
101
Encounters and Transformations
125
Vancouvers Vision of Native Peoples
147
Whose Scourge?
165
The Career of William Ellis
193
Colonised Lives
215
The Great Map of Mankind
237
Exploring the Pacific Exploring James Cook
251
The Works ofGlyndwr Williams
271
Index
321
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About the author (1999)

Alan Frost is professor of history at La Trobe University, Australia. Jane Samson is professor of history at the University of Alberta.

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