Packinghouse Daughter: A Memoir

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Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 280 pages
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The violence that erupted when the company "replaced" its union workers with strikebreakers tested family loyalty and community stability, and attracted national attention when the governor of Minnesota called in the National Guard, declared martial law, and closed the plant.

Register skillfully interweaves her own memories, historical research, and first-person interviews of participants on both sides of the strike into a narrative that is thoughtful and impassioned about the value of blue-collar work and the dignity of those who do it. Packinghouse Daughter also testifies to the hold that childhood experience has on personal values and notions of social class, despite the upward mobility that is the great promise of American democracy.
 

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Packinghouse daughter: a memoir

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This is both a bittersweet memoir of growing up in the 1950s and a history of the 1959-60 strike at Wilson & Co. Meatpacking in Albert Lea, MN. Register (Living with Chronic Illness), the ... Read full review

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Contents

The Field Trip
25
Dad Talks about His Work
36
A Nod to Vegetariaos
47
At the End of the Trail
50
How We Became Working Class
75
A Dream of Joe Hill
99
Hearsay
119
1959
135
English Lessons
192
Under Siege
196
Dear Governor Freeman
213
Back to Work
216
Faith in the Face of Reality
232
How to Make History
243
My Vengeance on the Wienie Moguls
249
Mellowing
259

On Strike
149
Fellow Adversaries
165
The Breaking Point
176
Acknowledgments
277
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