Paestum: And Other Poems

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Brentano's, 1909 - 90 pages
 

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Page 52 - So every spirit, as it is most pure, And hath in it the more of heavenly light, So it the fairer body doth procure To habit in, and it more fairly dight, With cheerful grace and amiable sight. For, of the soul, the body form doth take, For soul is form, and doth the body make.
Page 25 - And death's devastation and dearth Shall be spread o'er the face of the earth. Avenging the death of the wood, The turbulent streams shall outpour Their vials of wrath, and no more Shall their banks hold back the high flood, Which shall rush o'er the harvests of men ; As swiftly receding again. Lo ! after the flood shall be dearth, And the rain no longer shall fall On the parching fields ; and a pall, As of ashes, shall cover the earth ; And dust-clouds shall darken the sky; And the deep water wells...
Page 24 - The Passing of the Forest As long as the forest shall live, The streams shall flow onward, still singing Sweet songs of the woodland, and bringing The bright living waters that give New life to all mortals who thirst. But the races of men shall be cursed.
Page 24 - Yea, the hour of destruction shall come To the children of men in that day When the forest shall pass away ; When the low woodland voices are dumb ; And death's devastation and dearth Shall be spread o'er the face of the earth. Avenging the death of the wood, The turbulent streams shall outpour Their vials of wrath, and no more Shall their banks hold back the high flood, Which shall rush o'er the harvests of men ; As swiftly receding again. Lo ! after the flood shall be dearth, And the rain no longer...
Page 63 - FOR YOU AND ME FOR you and me a happy lot Had been some little house, a plot Of pleasant flowers, and a wall Where vines should grow, and lizards crawl When summer suns beat down full hot. There had we lived, and never sought To see beyond, and sighed for naught : No need of noble house nor hall For you and me. If now beyond or crib or cot Our house be grown, sure, I know not Why griefs should grow, or pleasures pall, Because the roof-tree is so tall, Or hearts become less warm, God wot, For you...
Page 70 - ... sightless eyes, benignly mild As of the early gods, or of some race Of men almost divine, look into space Beyond our mortal vision ; with no wild, Swift passion torn, so hast thou ever smiled,— Great love, immortal, lighting thy calm face. Born of the womb of earth, who doth beguile Both gods and men to woo her, for all time Thou art a thing of worship. Ah, sublime Mother of men ! We may not reconcile The darkness with the dream ; yet still we climb The starlit heights to win thy sacred smile.
Page 73 - ROBERT Louis STEVENSON (The Light-House Builder's Son.) BEHOLD ! a tower of light! where stood before The flickering flame that led our fathers home.
Page 24 - When the forests shall pass away ; When the low woodland voices are dumb ; And death's devastation and dearth Shall be spread o'er the face of the earth. Avenging the death of the wood, The turbulent streams shall outpour Their vials of wrath, and no more Shall their banks hold back the high flood, Which shall rush o'er the harvests of men; And, as swiftly receding again, THE PASSING OF THE FOREST 25 Lo!
Page 45 - Built, burned ; and then thy lyre Burst in a blaze of fire Seas shall not drown. First kindled in a woman's eyes, Fire burned high Troy ; and beckoned men From home ; and from the skies The gods.
Page 46 - The book was thine. Of life's brave book the leaves are turned, And as we read we wonder how Thy blinded eyes discerned Life's hidden fires,—that burned Even then as now.

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