A Pagan Place

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1970 - Fiction - 206 pages
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A PAGAN PLACE is Edna O'Brien's true novel of Ireland. Here she returns to that uniquely wonderful, terrible, peculiar place she once called home and writes not only of a life there--of the child becoming a woman--but of the Irish experience out of which that life arises--perhaps more pointedly than in any of her other works. This is the Ireland of country villages and barley fields, of druids in the woods, of unknown babies in the womb, of mischievous girls and Tans with guns. Ireland has marked Edna O'Brien's life and work with unmistakable color and depth, and here she recreates her homeland with a singular grace and intensity.
 

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User Review  - thesmellofbooks - LibraryThing

God, O'Brien is good! Once I get over the fact that this reads unlike a normal a novel with its clear plot and obvious arc, but as an almost poeticly observed stream of consciousness, I settle into ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
18
Section 3
72
Section 4
78
Section 5
100
Section 6
120
Section 7
130
Section 8
134
Section 9
159
Section 10
190
Section 11
197
Section 12
200
Section 13
203
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About the author (1970)

EDNA O'BRIEN is the author of eighteen works of fiction, including the New York Times Notable Books and Book Sense picks Wild Decembers and In the Forest, and Lantern Slides, which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. In 2002 she won the National Medal for Fiction from the National Arts Club. An honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, O'Brien was born and grew up in Ireland and has lived in London for many years.

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