Pages from the journal of an author, Fyodor Dostoevsky

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John W. Luce and Co., 1916 - Authors, Russian - 117 pages
 

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Page 112 - Russia, perhaps more than all other nations, is chiefly predestined ; I see its traces in our history, our men of genius, in the artistic genius of Pushkin. Let our country be poor, but this poor land ' Christ traversed with blessing, in the garb of a serf.
Page 67 - Do I speak of economic glory, of the glory of the sword or of science ? I speak only of the brotherhood of man ; I say that to this universal, omni-human union the heart of Russia, perhaps more than all other nations, is chiefly predestined ; I see its traces in our history, our men of genius, in the artistic genius of Pushkin.
Page 66 - I repeat, the people felt that purpose unconsciously, but it felt it directly and quite vitally. Surely we then turned at once to the most vital reunion, to the unity of all mankind! Not in a spirit of enmity (as one might have thought it would have been) but in friendliness and perfect love, we received into our soul the geniuses of foreign nations, all alike without preference of race, able by instinct from almost the very first step to discern, to discount distinctions, to excuse and reconcile...
Page 105 - She is on the eve of ruin, your Europe, of a general, universal and terrible catastrophe. The ant-hill which has long been in course of formation within her, without a Church and without Christ (for the Church, having muddied her ideal, was long ago embodied in the State), with a moral principle shattered to its foundations, having lost all that it had of universal and of absolute, — that ant-hill, 1 say, is wholly undermined.
Page 30 - Let it be that this will never come to pass, and there will be no paradise — that at least I understand — well, still I will preach. And it is so simple: in one day, in one hour, everything would be settled at once. The one thing is — Love thy neighbour as thyself — that is the one thing. That is all, nothing else is needed. You will instantly find how to live. Though it is an old truth, repeated and read ten million times, yet it is still to be discovered. 'The knowledge of life is higher...
Page 30 - The consciousness of life is higher than life, the knowledge of the laws of happiness is higher than happiness — that is what one must contend against.
Page 67 - For what has Russian policy been doing for these two centuries if not serving Europe, perhaps, far more than she has served herself.
Page 68 - ... the sword, the achievements of science, or of economic grandeurs. For I am convinced that the heart of Russia, more than any other nation, is dedicated to this universal union of all mankind; I see this from our history, our great men, and the artistic spirit of Pushkin. Our land may not flourish, but this poor land 'Christ traversed with blessing, in the garb of a serf.
Page 106 - ... yet it was solely for this purpose that all the civic institutions of Europe (long since un-Christian, which are now perfectly pagan) have hitherto been formed. This unnaturalness and these ' insoluble ' political questions (which are, by the way, familiar to everybody) must infallibly lead to one huge, final, disintegrating, political war, in which all Powers will have a share, and which will break out in our century, perhaps even in the coming decade. And do you think that society now can endure...
Page 28 - ... only for myself, for myself; but I wept over them, pitying them. I stretched out my hands to them in despair, blaming, cursing and despising myself. I told them that all this was my doing, mine alone; that it was I had brought them corruption, contamination and falsity. I besought them to crucify me, I taught them how to make a cross. I could not kill myself, I had not the strength, but I wanted to suffer at their hands. I yearned for suffering, I longed that my blood should be drained to the...

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