Paid Care in Australia: Politics, Profits, Practices

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Debra King, Gabrielle Meagher
Sydney University Press, 2009 - Child care - 252 pages
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Care for Australia's children and elderly is provided in a mixed economy, in which for-profit providers are playing an increasingly important role alongside more traditional government and non-government organisations. Does the growth of for-profit provision affect the quality of services or of jobs in paid care? Does it change the political dynamics of the social care sector in contemporary welfare states? How might service users, their families, and organisations work together to sustain and improve the quality of care services? What theories and evidence help us to understand the process and consequences of the shift toward for-profit provision of social care? In nine chapters by leading researchers, this book explores these and other questions, to inform policy and practice in this key field of social policy.
 

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Contents

Introduction politics profits and practices in child and aged care
1
References
9
The political economy of forprofit paid care theory and evidence
13
Mapping the territory
15
arguments for and against
18
Arguments against forprofit paid care
20
Arguments that forprofit status doesnt matter
23
Evidence from social care systems
25
References
141
Blurred boundaries how paid careworkers and care managers negotiate work relationships
145
Paid careworkers in Australia
146
What do we know of the experiences of careworkers?
147
method and participants
149
results
152
Transcending boundaries
154
Care managers perspectives
155

Residential aged care
26
Child care
28
Home care for the elderly and people with disabilities
31
Taking stock
34
References
36
Forprofit organisations in managed markets for human services
43
Human services
44
Managed markets
49
Forms of managed markets
52
Forprofit organisations
56
Forprofit organisations in managed markets for human services
58
Barriers to entry
60
Entry and market type
61
Market power
62
The effect of history politics and place
63
Contract failure theory
64
Relational approaches in regulating entry
69
A future scenario?
71
Conclusion
72
References
73
Outsourcing of elder care services in Sweden effects on work environment and political legitimacy
81
The context of the study
83
New public management in Swedish elder care
84
Social infrastructure and public employers
87
a case study
89
Private and public employment and the psychosocial work environment
90
Perceptions of local politicians in purchaserprovider systems
94
Who wants more outsourced elder care?
97
Summary and conclusions
105
Political control
106
Internal legitimacy and social infrastructure
107
References
108
Appendix
112
Caring for profit? The impact of forprofit providers on the quality of employment in paid care
113
Caring forprofit? Or caring for profit?
115
The data
120
Working in aged care
123
flexibility and the staffing mix
124
caring for residents
128
attitudes opinions and job satisfaction
133
Does ownership type really matter?
138
Careworkers perspectives
158
Points of tension between managers and careworkers
161
Conclusion
163
References
165
Parents as consumers of early childhood education and care the feasibility of demandled improvements to quality
167
Market rationality imperfections and intervention mechanisms
169
Demand and supplyside imperfections
170
Demand and supplyside intervention mechanisms
172
The feasibility of demandled improvements to quality
175
an explanatory note
176
A Parents as uninformed undiscerning consumers focused on private benefits with limited agencypower
180
B Parents as potentially informed and discerning consumers focused on private benefits with some agencypower
182
C Parents as informed discerning communityfocused consumers with considerable agencypower
184
D Parents as informed discerning consumers focused on private benefits with considerable agencypower
187
E Parents as informed discerning activist citizenconsumers focused on social benefits with considerable agencypower
189
Concluding thoughts
194
References
197
Improving quality in Australian child care the role of the media and nonprofit providers
203
quality versus quantity measures
204
The child care quality assurance regime in Australia
205
Factors influencing parental decisions about child care
207
The role of the media in influencing parental understandings of quality child care
210
Content analysis of media coverage of child care
211
Method
212
Results
213
Discussion of findings
217
the role of nonprofit providers
218
From service providers to advocates? Strategies for making an impact
221
Strategic communication
222
Conclusion
223
References
225
The giant in the playground investigating the reach and implications of the corporatisation of child care provision
231
Introduction
232
Market domination
234
Interrelationships
237
Professional identity
239
Curriculum
242
Policy impact
244
Conclusion
247
References
249
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