Painless Childbirth; a General Survey of All Painless Methods: With Special Stress on "twilight Sleep" and Its Extension to America

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Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1915 - Anesthesia in obstetrics - 316 pages
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Page 77 - And the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall on Adam, and he slept; and He took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh in its place. Then the rib which the Lord God had taken from man He made into a woman, and He brought her to the man. And Adam said: "This is now bone of my bones And flesh of my flesh; She shall be called Woman, Because she was taken out of Man.
Page 81 - Most, indeed, have subsequently set out, like zealous missionaries, to persuade other friends to avail themselves of the same measure of relief in their hour of trial and travail ; and a number of my most esteemed professional brethren in Edinburgh have adopted it with success, and results equal to my own. All of us, I most sincerely believe, are called upon to employ it by every principle of true humanity...
Page 78 - I do not believe that any one in Dublin has as yet used a carriage in locomotion ; the feeling here is very strong against its use in ordinary progression, and merely to avert the ordinary amount of fatigue which the Almighty has seen fit — and most wisely we cannot doubt — to allot to natural walking; and in this feeling I heartily and entirely concur.
Page vii - If a woman becomes weary, or at last dead, from bearing, that matters not; let her only die from bearing. She is there to do it.
Page 42 - Else, let her pray for death. Her lord, if he be wearied of the face Withindoors, gets him forth ; some merrier place Will ease his heart : but she waits on, her whole Vision enchained on a single soul.
Page 77 - Supposing, for example, it referred to the first introduction of carriages into use; it would then read thus: — "I do not believe that any one in Dublin has as yet used a carriage in locomotion ; the feeling here is very strong against its use in ordinary progression, and merely to avert the ordinary amount of fatigue which the Almighty has seen fit — and most wisely we cannot doubt — to allot to natural walking ; and in this feeling I heartily and entirely concur.
Page 130 - ... We have also observed that the tendency toward engorgement of the breasts is notably diminished in these cases. This is probably due to the action of scopolamine on the peripheral secretory nerves. Conclusions.
Page 113 - ... in the child. The scopolamine does not diminish pain, but simply quiets restlessness. As a member of the Gynecological Touring Club of America, in the summer of 1912, I had the privilege of observing this method at Freiburg in the clinic under the superintendence of Professors Kroenig and Gauss. It was interesting to hear that the morphia was employed in a single moderate dose, followed by small quantities of scopolamine. Evidently the disadvantages of the treatment — hemorrhage and asphyxia...
Page 78 - The squalling of the child did not, as usual, rouse her; and some minutes elapsed after the placenta was expelled, and after the child was removed by the nurse into another room, before the patient awoke. She then turned round and observed to me that she had "enjoyed a very comfortable sleep, and indeed required it, as she was so tired, but would now be more able for the work before her.
Page 131 - Pain is markedly diminished in all cases, while amnesia is present in the greatest number of patients. 8. This treatment does not in any way interfere with any other therapeutic measures which may be deemed necessary for the termination of labor. 9. Fetal heart sounds must be carefully watched. Sudden slowing calls for immediate delivery when possible or the discontinuance of the treatment.

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