Painting and Interior Decoration ; History of Architecture and Ornament, Volume 100

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International Textbook Company, 1909 - Architecture - 528 pages
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Page 75 - The first cost mentioned can be learned only by experience, as the prices vary from year to year and in different parts of the country. A...
Page 1 - Prussian blue, but extremely powerful and transparent, and may be substituted for some of the uses of Prussian blue, as the latter is for indigo. Indigo blue is of great body, and glazes and works well, both in oil and water...
Page 8 - The drying of raw linseed oil may be accelerated by adding about 1 pound of white lead to every gallon of oil, and allowing it to settle for at least a week. Not only is the color of the oil thus improved, but the lead may be afterwards used for ordinary work. Several...
Page 10 - Driers are substances added to paint in order to cause the oil to thicken and solidify more rapidly. The drying of linseed oil is caused by the absorption of oxygen, and there is little doubt that driers usually act simply as carriers of oxygen to the oil, a very small quantity yielding quite extensive results. The best driers, therefore, are those containing a large proportion of oxygen, such as litharge, acetate of lead, red lead, sulphate of zinc, verdigris, etc., which, added to the oils, improve...
Page 1 - BLUE, or Celestial, is made by precipitating the alumina from a solution of alum by carbonate of soda, washing the precipitate, and adding sulphate of baryta, sulphate of iron, yellow prussiate of potash, and some bichromate of potash. When dried, this mixture is known as Brunswick blue, but when the sulphate of baryta is left out, and the material not dried, it is called Damp Blue.
Page 1 - It is of great body, and glazes and works well both in water and oil. Its relative permanence as a dye has obtained it a false character of extreme durability in painting — a quality in which it is very inferior even to Prussian blue.
Page 12 - The value of a varnish depends almost entirely on that of its constituents, but much care and skill are demanded in mixing and boiling the ingredients. Varnish is used to give brilliancy to painted surfaces and to protect them from the action of the atmosphere or from any slight friction. Varnish is often applied to plain, unpainted wood surfaces in...
Page iv - Blue black is a well burned and levigated charcoal of a cool neutral color, not differing in other respects from the common Frankfort black. Blue black was formerly much employed in painting, and, in common with all carbonaceous blacks, has, when duly mixed with white, a preserving influence upon that color. This influence is...
Page iv - ... All paint is composed of two general ingredients, namely, the pigment and the fluid medium. The former usually consists of a mineral oxide or precipitated vegetable dye, which very largely forms the body of the paint, and determines its color, while the latter consists of the oil, varnish, or water in which the pigment is dissolved or suspended, according to the character of which, the paint is termed oil color or water color. Oil colors are used in all places where the purpose of the paint is...
Page 6 - Cassel-earth with the browns of his pictures. The Vandyke browns in use at present appear to be terrene pigments of a similar kind, purified by grinding and washing over: they vary sometimes in hue and in degrees of drying in oil, which they in general do tardily, owing to their bituminous nature, but are good browns of powerful body, and are durable both in water and oil.

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