Palatal Consonants in English

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Columbia College., 1891 - English language - 58 pages
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Page 22 - The object of this book is to give a faithful picture— a phonetic photograph— of educated spoken English as distinguished from vulgar and provincial English on the one hand, and literary English on the other.
Page 23 - I must disclaim any intention of setting up a standard of spoken English. All I can do is to record those facts which are accessible to me — to describe that variety of spoken English of which I have a personal knowledge, that is, the educated speech of London and the district round it — the original home of Standard English both in its spoken and literary form.
Page 44 - ... pronounced pro-nun-she-a'shun, and by all speakers would probably be so sounded if it were related to any such verb as to pronunciate, in the same way as association and enunciation are related to associate and enunciate. In the absence of any such related verb, most speakers say prontin-se-a'shun, and so avoid the double occurrence of the sound of sh in the same word.
Page 44 - The word pronunciation is regularly pronounced pro-nun'she-a"-shun, and by all speakers would probably be so sounded, if it were related to any such verb as to pronunciate, in the same way that association and enunciation are related to associate and enunciate. In the absence of any such related verb, most speakers say prA-nun'ce-a"-shun, and so avoid the double occurrence of the sound sh in the same word.
Page 8 - In the course of time, the original gutturals became palatals in certain situations, and these again affected the sounds in their vicinity in a particular manner.
Page 43 - Webster was not, but this sound has been adopted by the editors of the later editions of his dictionary.
Page 49 - It is not at all impossible that, to some extent, an e may have been inserted between so and one of the guttural vowels, to indicate that so had the pronunciation of sh.
Page 27 - ... the next in conjugation. They likewise change the c of the root into z before o and a, in order to preserve the soft sound which the c has in the infinitive : Ex. Indicative Present. Cuezo, cueces, cuece, cuecen.
Page 54 - English verbs abolish, accomplish, banish, blandish, blemish, brandish, burnish, cherish, demolish, embellish, establish, finish, flourish, furbish, furnish, garnish, guarish, impoverish, languish, nourish, planish, polish, punish, ravish, relinquish, replenish, skirmish, tarnish, vanish, vanquish, varnish.
Page 44 - Smart marks this word pronunceashun, yet he says in his " Principles " : " It is regularly pronounced pronunsheashun, and by all speakers would probably be so sounded if it were related...

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