Pale Gray for Guilt: A Travis McGee Novel

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Random House Publishing Group, Jan 8, 2013 - Fiction - 320 pages
1 Review
"To diggers a thousand years from now...the works of John D. MacDonald would be a treasure on the order of the tomb of Tutankhamen."

Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

The men who killed Tush Bannon knew he was a nice guy with a nice wife and three nice kids--trying to run a small marina on the Florida coast. They also knew he was in the way of a big land development scheme. Once they killed him, they figured they were on easy street. But Tush Bannon was Travis McGee's friend and McGee could be one tough adversary when protecting a widow and her kids....
 

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PALE GRAY FOR GUILT

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Travis McGee with "his full complete share of mouth," and Meyer, philosophizing all the way, try to help the widow of an old friend who had been squeezed and then altogether eliminated in a real ... Read full review

Review: Pale Gray for Guilt (Travis McGee #9)

User Review  - Chris - Goodreads

Pale Gray is among my many favorites of the Travis McGee series. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
17
Section 3
38
Section 4
55
Section 5
67
Section 6
85
Section 7
104
Section 8
113
Section 11
173
Section 12
187
Section 13
214
Section 14
217
Section 15
230
Section 16
245
Section 17
261
Section 18
288

Section 9
134
Section 10
151
Section 19
307
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

I remember the house in Utica, New York, where John D. grew up. The curtains were always closed and the atmosphere seemed invariably dark and somber. Nothing there predicted his imaginative outpouring. Imagination was frivolity and frivolity was not on the agenda.

He followed his own father's path toward the commercial world. While earning a Master's Degree in Business Administration from Harvard, he married Dorothy Prentiss, an artist, and produced one small son. Then he went off to war. The marriage of the business graduate and the creative person was the unrecognized first step in John D.'s becoming an author.

During service in China, Burma, and India, his mail was heavily censored. In frustration he wrote a short story and sent it to my mother. She saw his potential and sold the story. When my father came home, a Lieutenant Colonel and Harvard graduate, his father presented him with a list of plum career options. He turned them down and took an undemanding job so that he could pour his energy into writing.

Eventually, we moved to Florida. For my parents, Florida was the land of light, the place where the curtains were never drawn. The place itself became a topic and Travis McGee strode into the landscape.

Maynard MacDonald

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